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strptime

(PHP 5 >= 5.1.0)

strptime Parse a time/date generated with strftime()

Description

array strptime ( string $date , string $format )

strptime() returns an array with the date parsed, or FALSE on error.

Month and weekday names and other language dependent strings respect the current locale set with setlocale() (LC_TIME).

Parameters

date (string)

The string to parse (e.g. returned from strftime()).

format (string)

The format used in date (e.g. the same as used in strftime()). Note that some of the format options available to strftime() may not have any effect within strptime(); the exact subset that are supported will vary based on the operating system and C library in use.

For more information about the format options, read the strftime() page.

Return Values

Returns an array or FALSE on failure.

The following parameters are returned in the array
parameters Description
"tm_sec" Seconds after the minute (0-61)
"tm_min" Minutes after the hour (0-59)
"tm_hour" Hour since midnight (0-23)
"tm_mday" Day of the month (1-31)
"tm_mon" Months since January (0-11)
"tm_year" Years since 1900
"tm_wday" Days since Sunday (0-6)
"tm_yday" Days since January 1 (0-365)
"unparsed" the date part which was not recognized using the specified format

Examples

Example #1 strptime() example

<?php
$format 
'%d/%m/%Y %H:%M:%S';
$strf strftime($format);

echo 
"$strf\n";

print_r(strptime($strf$format));
?>

The above example will output something similar to:

03/10/2004 15:54:19

Array
(
    [tm_sec] => 19
    [tm_min] => 54
    [tm_hour] => 15
    [tm_mday] => 3
    [tm_mon] => 9
    [tm_year] => 104
    [tm_wday] => 0
    [tm_yday] => 276
    [unparsed] =>
)

Notes

Note: This function is not implemented on Windows platforms.

Note:

Internally, this function calls the strptime() function provided by the system's C library. This function can exhibit noticeably different behaviour across different operating systems. The use of date_parse_from_format(), which does not suffer from these issues, is recommended on PHP 5.3.0 and later.

Note:

"tm_sec" includes any leap seconds (currently upto 2 a year). For more information on leap seconds, see the » Wikipedia article on leap seconds.

Note:

Prior to PHP 5.2.0, this function could return undefined behaviour. Notably, the "tm_sec", "tm_min" and "tm_hour" entries would return undefined values.

See Also

  • checkdate() - Validate a Gregorian date
  • strftime() - Format a local time/date according to locale settings

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User Contributed Notes 12 notes

up
5
131
3 years ago
Another portage for windows (from ex/yks toolkit)
<?php
//  public static
function strptime($date, $format) {
   
$masks = array(
     
'%d' => '(?P<d>[0-9]{2})',
     
'%m' => '(?P<m>[0-9]{2})',
     
'%Y' => '(?P<Y>[0-9]{4})',
     
'%H' => '(?P<H>[0-9]{2})',
     
'%M' => '(?P<M>[0-9]{2})',
     
'%S' => '(?P<S>[0-9]{2})',
    
// usw..
   
);

   
$rexep = "#".strtr(preg_quote($format), $masks)."#";
    if(!
preg_match($rexep, $date, $out))
      return
false;

   
$ret = array(
     
"tm_sec"  => (int) $out['S'],
     
"tm_min"  => (int) $out['M'],
     
"tm_hour" => (int) $out['H'],
     
"tm_mday" => (int) $out['d'],
     
"tm_mon"  => $out['m']?$out['m']-1:0,
     
"tm_year" => $out['Y'] > 1900 ? $out['Y'] - 1900 : 0,
    );
    return
$ret;
  }
?>
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2
emanuil dot tolev at gmail dot com
2 years ago
Be careful: the output of strptime() ( http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.strptime.php ) cannot always be used with mktime() ( http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.mktime.php )!

This is not because of what platform you're using or what format strings glibc supports. This is simply because strptime returns years SINCE 1900 (as documented above) and mktime expects a year in the format returned by date('Y') - which is the full 4 digits.

Therefore, if you parse a date with strptime and want to give it to mktime, you have to pass in ($parsed_time['tm_year'] + 1900) as the year parameter to mktime(), not just $parsed_time['tm_year'].

This issue arose when I had a date like: 19/06/2012 12:03:34. strtotime() doesn't parse this particular format, so I needed custom parsing. So I ended up with:
1. $ts = $service->getNeededDateTime();
2. $ts = strptime($ts, '%d/%m/%Y %H:%M:%S');
3. $ts = mktime($ts['tm_hour'], $ts['tm_min'], $ts['tm_sec'],
      $ts['tm_mon'], $ts['tm_mday'], ($ts['tm_year'] + 1900));
up
1
P.
6 years ago
If strptime() fails to match all of the format string and therefore an error occurred the function returns NULL.
up
1
chad 0x40 herballure 0x2e com
7 years ago
The result of strptime() is not affected by the current timezone setting, even though strftime() is. Tested in PHP 5.1.6.
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1
Malte Starostik
8 years ago
It says "Parse a time/date generated with strftime()" but that's not entirely correct -- While strptime("2006131", "%Y%W%u") works as expected, strptime("2006131", "%G%V%u") returns false instead of reversing the equivalent - and unambiguous - strftime() usage.  I suspect that's because glibc doesn't support that.  Anyway, this docu page fails to mention that apparently not all format components supported by strftime() can be used with strptime().
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0
arnold at nijboer dot it
7 months ago
the example (or the function) has an inconsistancy with other PHP functions.

the example returns 104 for the year 2004

while in the strftime function the 2 digit year is 70-100 for 1970-2000
and 1-69 for 2001-2069
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0
Quietust
5 years ago
On some systems, particularly those of BSD lineage (such as FreeBSD and MacOS X), the tm_wday and tm_yday fields are only initialized if requested explicitly (that is, if the %a/%A/%u/%w and %j formats are specified), while others such as Linux and Solaris will calculate them automatically.
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0
Altar 2010
5 years ago
If you want to parse a date or a /time in windows env, i re-write strptime function for windows.

I use the same param and i return the same think that the original one.
I use sscanf to parde the string.
Only some format can be parsed (%S, %M, %H, %d, %m, %Y)

See this page (because the function is too big for this notes)
http://sauron.lionel.free.fr/?page=php_lib_strptime

preview :
<?php
/**
* Parse a time/date generated with strftime().
*
* This function is the same as the original one defined by PHP (Linux/Unix only),
*  but now you can use it on Windows too.
*  Limitation : Only this format can be parsed %S, %M, %H, %d, %m, %Y
*
* @author Lionel SAURON
* @version 1.0
* @public
*
* @param $sDate(string)    The string to parse (e.g. returned from strftime()).
* @param $sFormat(string)  The format used in date  (e.g. the same as used in strftime()).
* @return (array)          Returns an array with the <code>$sDate</code> parsed, or <code>false</code> on error.
*/
if(function_exists("strptime") == false)
{
    function
strptime($sDate, $sFormat)
    {
       
$aResult = array
        (
           
'tm_sec'   => 0,
           
'tm_min'   => 0,
           
'tm_hour'  => 0,
           
'tm_mday'  => 1,
           
'tm_mon'   => 0,
           
'tm_year'  => 0,
           
'tm_wday'  => 0,
           
'tm_yday'  => 0,
           
'unparsed' => $sDate,
        );
       
        while(
$sFormat != "")
        {
           
// ===== Search a %x element, Check the static string before the %x =====
           
$nIdxFound = strpos($sFormat, '%');
            if(
$nIdxFound === false)
            {
               
               
// There is no more format. Check the last static string.
               
$aResult['unparsed'] = ($sFormat == $sDate) ? "" : $sDate;
                break;
            }
       
        .....
        .....
        .....
        .....
       
       
// ===== Create the other value of the result array =====
       
$nParsedDateTimestamp = mktime($aResult['tm_hour'], $aResult['tm_min'], $aResult['tm_sec'],
                               
$aResult['tm_mon'] + 1, $aResult['tm_mday'], $aResult['tm_year'] + 1900);
       
       
// Before PHP 5.1 return -1 when error
       
if(($nParsedDateTimestamp === false)
        ||(
$nParsedDateTimestamp === -1)) return false;
       
       
$aResult['tm_wday'] = (int) strftime("%w", $nParsedDateTimestamp); // Days since Sunday (0-6)
       
$aResult['tm_yday'] = (strftime("%j", $nParsedDateTimestamp) - 1); // Days since January 1 (0-365)

       
return $aResult;
    }
// END of function
   
} // END if(function_exists("strptime") == false)
?>
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0
firefox3107 at gmail dot com
6 years ago
For Windows user! It's rather the same as strptime!
It uses the previous function: but call strToTime($date, $format) to strToDate($date, $format) because this name is forgiven!

<?php
function strToDateTime($date, $format) {
    if(!(
$date = strToDate($date, $format))) return;
   
$dateTime = array('sec' => 0, 'min' => 0, 'hour' => 0, 'day' => 0, 'mon' => 0, 'year' => 0, 'timestamp' => 0);
    foreach(
$date as $key => $val) {
        switch(
$key) {
            case
'd':
            case
'j': $dateTime['day'] = intval($val); break;
            case
'D': $dateTime['day'] = intval(date('j', $val)); break;
           
            case
'm':
            case
'n': $dateTime['mon'] = intval($val); break;
            case
'M': $dateTime['mon'] = intval(date('n', $val)); break;
           
            case
'Y': $dateTime['year'] = intval($val); break;
            case
'y': $dateTime['year'] = intval($val)+2000; break;
           
            case
'G':
            case
'g':
            case
'H':
            case
'h': $dateTime['hour'] = intval($val); break;
           
            case
'i': $dateTime['min'] = intval($val); break;
           
            case
's': $dateTime['sec'] = intval($val); break;
        }
    }
   
$dateTime['timestamp'] = mktime($dateTime['hour'], $dateTime['min'], $dateTime['sec'], $dateTime['mon'], $dateTime['day'], $dateTime['year']);
    return
$dateTime;
}
?>
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0
svenr at selfhtml dot org
7 years ago
If you need strptime but are restricted to a php version which does not support it (windows or before PHP 5), note that MySQL since Version 4.1.1 offers (almost?) the same functionality with the STR_TO_DATE function.

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/4.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html
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0
DT <pwadas at gazeta dot pl>
8 years ago
<?php
//This turns non-standard but often used "datetime" string
//like '20060810084251' into nice formatted date
//'Thursday, 10 August 2006 08:42:51 CEST'
//note, that strptime returns day of year counting from 0, so
//you need to put 1 as month number to get appropriate
//month for the daycount. for 2006 strptime for unknown
//reason returns 106, so I simply add 1900

$informat = '%Y%m%d%H%M%S';
$outformat '%A, %d %B %Y %T %Z';
$ftime = strptime("20060810084251",$informat);
$unxTimestamp = mktime(
                   
$ftime['tm_hour'],
                   
$ftime['tm_min'],
                   
$ftime['tm_sec'],
                   
1 ,
                   
$ftime['tm_yday'] + 1,
                  
$ftime['tm_year'] + 1900
                
);
//setlocale(LC_TIME,'pl_PL');
echo strftime($outformat , $unxTimestamp );
?>
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0
jojyjob at gmail dot com
8 years ago
/***Finding the days of a week ***/

<?php

$out
= pre(); 
$outpre=nextweek();
$td=date("Y-m-d");
$result = array_reverse($outpre);
//print_r($result);
array_push($result,$td);
$newarray = array_merge($result,$out);

  foreach(
$newarray as $date1){
    echo
$date1;
    echo
"<br>";
}

//print_r($out);
//print_r($newarray);

function pre() 
{
$monP=0;
$tueP=1;
$wedP=2;
$thuP=3;
$friP=4;
$satP=5;
$sunP=6;
 
$td=date("Y-m-d");  
//echo $td;
$tdname=date("l"); 
  switch(
$tdname)
  {
   case
"Monday":
      
$rep=$monP;
       break;
   case
"Tuesday":
      
$rep=$tueP;
       break;
   case
"Wednesday":
      
$rep=$wedP;
       break;
   case
"Thursday":
      
$rep=$thuP;
       break;
   case
"Friday":
      
$rep=$friP;
       break;
   case
"Saturday":
      
$rep=$satP;      
       break;
   case
"Sunday":
      
$rep=$sunP;      
       break;      
   default:
       echo
"Sorry";      
  }


//echo $tdname."<br>";  
//echo $rep;
$datstart =$td/* the starting date */
//$rep = 12;  /* number of future dates to display */
$nod = 1/* number of days in the future to increment the date */
$nom = 0/* number of months in the future to increment the date */
$noy = 0/* number of years in the future to increment the date */
$precon=future_date($datstart,$rep,$nod,$nom,$noy);
return
$precon;
}
function
future_date($datstart,$rep,$nod,$nom,$noy) {
$pre = array();
  while (
$rep >= 1) {
   
$datyy=substr($datstart,0,4);
   
$datmm=substr($datstart,5,2);
   
$datdd=substr($datstart,8,2);
   
$fda=$datdd - $nod;
   
$fmo=$datmm - $nom;
   
$fyr=$datyy -$noy;
   
$dat1=date("Y-m-d", mktime(0,0,0,$fmo,$fda,$fyr))."<BR>";
   
array_push($pre,$dat1);
   
//echo $dat1;
   
$datstart=$dat1;
   
$rep--;
  }
  return
$pre;
}

function
nextweek()
{
$monN=6;
$tueN=5;
$wedN=4;
$thuN=3;
$friN=2;
$satN=1;
$sunN=0;

$td=date("Y-m-d");  
$tdname=date("l"); 
  switch(
$tdname)
  {
   case
"Monday":
      
$rep=$monN;
       break;
   case
"Tuesday":
      
$rep=$tueN;
       break;
   case
"Wednesday":
      
$rep=$wedN;
       break;
   case
"Thursday":
      
$rep=$thuN;
       break;
   case
"Friday":
      
$rep=$friN;
       break;
   case
"Saturday":
      
$rep=$satN;      
       break;
   case
"Sunday":
      
$rep=$sunN;      
       break;      
   default:
       echo
"Sorry";      
  }


//echo $tdname."<br>";  
//echo $rep;
$datstart =$td/* the starting date */
//$rep = 12;  /* number of future dates to display */
$nod = 1/* number of days in the future to increment the date */
$nom = 0/* number of months in the future to increment the date */
$noy = 0/* number of years in the future to increment the date */

$con = future_date1($datstart,$rep,$nod,$nom,$noy);
return
$con;
}

function
future_date1($datstart,$rep,$nod,$nom,$noy) {
$pre = array();
  while (
$rep >= 1) {
   
$datyy=substr($datstart,0,4);
   
$datmm=substr($datstart,5,2);
   
$datdd=substr($datstart,8,2);
   
$fda=$datdd + $nod;
   
$fmo=$datmm + $nom;
   
$fyr=$datyy + $noy;
   
$dat1=date("Y-m-d", mktime(0,0,0,$fmo,$fda,$fyr))."<BR>";
   
array_push($pre,$dat1);
   
//echo $dat1;
   
$datstart=$dat1;
   
$rep--;
  }
  return
$pre;
}

?>
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