PHP 5.4.31 Released

本ドキュメントにおける疑似的な型および変数

mixed

mixed は、引数に多様な型 (全てである必要はない) を使うことができることを示します。

例えば gettype() 関数は全ての PHP の型を受け入れるのに対し、 str_replace() は文字列と配列のみを受け入れます。

number

number は引数が integer または float のどちらでもよいことを示します。

callback

callback 疑似型がこのドキュメントで使われていたのは、PHP 5.4 で callable タイプヒントが導入される前のことでした。両者はまったく同じ意味です。

void

返り値の型が void である場合は、 返り値に意味がないことを表します。パラメータ一覧で void が使用されている場合は、 その関数がパラメータを受け付けないことを表します。

...

関数のプロトタイプ宣言における $... は、 …など を表します。 この変数名を用いるのは、たとえば任意の数の引数を取りうる関数などです。

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User Contributed Notes 10 notes

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25
phpguy at lifetoward dot com
5 years ago
I noticed two important thing about putting callbacks into an arg list when calling a function:

1. The function to which the callback refers must be defined earlier in the source stream. So for example:

function main() {...; usort($array, 'sortfunction'); ... }
function sortfunction($a, $b){ return 0; }

Will NOT work, but this will:

function sortfunction($a, $b){ return 0; }
function main() {...; usort($array, 'sortfunction'); ... }

2. It's not really just a string. For example, this doesn't work:

usort($array, ($reverse?'reversesorter':'forwardsorter'));

I found these two discoveries quite counterintuitive.
up
0
michael dot martinek at gmail dot com
4 years ago
The documentation is a little confusing, and with the recent OO changes it adds a little more to the confusion.

I was curious whether you could pass an object through the user func, modify it in that callback and have the actual object updated or whether some cloning was going on behind the scenes.

<?php
   
class Test
   
{
        var
$sValue = 'abc';

        function
testing($objTest)
        {
           
$objTest->sValue = '123';
        }
    }

   
$obj = new Test();

   
call_user_func(array($obj, 'testing'), $obj);

   
var_dump($obj);

?>

This works as expected: The object is not cloned, and $sValue is properly set to '123'. With the OO changes in PHP 5, you don't need to do "function testing(&$objTest)" as it is already passed by reference.
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-1
sahid dot ferdjaoui at gmail dot com
5 years ago
An example with PHP 5.3 and lambda functions

<?php

  array_map
(function ($value) {
    return new
MyFormElement ($value);
  },
$_POST);

?>
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-3
Edward
7 years ago
To recap mr dot lilov at gmail dot com's comment: If you want to pass a function as an argument to another function, for example "array_map", do this:

regular functions:
<?
array_map(intval, $array)
?>

static functions in a class:
<?
array_map(array('MyClass', 'MyFunction'), $array)
?>

functions from an object:
<?
array_map(array($this, 'MyFunction'), $array)
?>

I hope this clarifies things a little bit
up
-4
Steve Jobs
2 months ago
I find these explanations and descriptions utterly useless.

After reading all of the PHP Documentation multiple times, only one question remains:

Were the college professors high on acid when they decided that it would be a good idea to assign the writing of PHP's Documentation as an extra credit assignment to a group of English as a Second Langauge (ESL) undergraduates who needed to get an "A" in their COMPUTER SCIENCE 101  class in order to avoid a beating from their parents over christmas break.
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-9
mike@EastGhostCom
1 year ago
If you pass a string as the callback function (i.e., 2nd parm to preg_replace_callback()), then PHP will interpret it as a function's name in the current scope -- and Main::dada_cb is not a valid function name in any scope.

If you want to specify a static method of a class as the callback (i.e., "Main::dada_cb"), then you must pass as 2nd parm to preg_replace_callback:

array( 'Main', 'dada_cb')

And, if you want to use as a callback some method of an instantiated object (i.e., $object->dada_cb), then you must pass as the 2nd parm to preg_replace_callback:

array( $object, 'dada_cb' )
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-8
Hayley Watson
7 years ago
The mixed pseudotype is explained as meaning "multiple but not necessarily all" types, and the example of str_replace(mixed, mixed, mixed) is given where "mixed" means "string or array".
Keep in mind that this refers to the types of the function's arguments _after_ any type juggling.
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-16
levi at alliancesoftware dot com dot au
7 years ago
Parent methods for callbacks should be called 'parent::method', so if you wish to call a non-static parent method via a callback, you should use a callback of
<?
// always works
$callback = array($this, 'parent::method')

// works but gives an error in PHP5 with E_STRICT if the parent method is not static
$callback array('parent', 'method');
?>
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-16
liam at helios-sites dot com
3 years ago
Note that (e.g.) usort calls on static methods of classes in a namespace need to be laid out as follows:

usort($arr, array('\Namespace\ClassName', 'functionName'));
up
-7
Steve Jobs
2 months ago
I find these explanations and descriptions utterly useless.

After reading all of the PHP Documentation multiple times, only one question remains: Were the college professors high on acid when they decided that it would be a good idea to assign the writing of PHP's Documentation as an extra credit assignment to a group of English as a Second Langauge (ESL) undergraduates who needed to get an "A" COMPUTER SCIENCE 101 in order to avoid a beating from their parents over christmas break.
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