SunshinePHP Developer Conference 2015

Properties

Class member variables are called "properties". You may also see them referred to using other terms such as "attributes" or "fields", but for the purposes of this reference we will use "properties". They are defined by using one of the keywords public, protected, or private, followed by a normal variable declaration. This declaration may include an initialization, but this initialization must be a constant value--that is, it must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated.

See Visibility for more information on the meanings of public, protected, and private.

Informacja:

In order to maintain backward compatibility with PHP 4, PHP 5 will still accept the use of the keyword var in property declarations instead of (or in addition to) public, protected, or private. However, var is no longer required. In versions of PHP from 5.0 to 5.1.3, the use of var was considered deprecated and would issue an E_STRICT warning, but since PHP 5.1.3 it is no longer deprecated and does not issue the warning.

If you declare a property using var instead of one of public, protected, or private, then PHP 5 will treat the property as if it had been declared as public.

Within class methods non-static properties may be accessed by using -> (Object Operator): $this->property (where property is the name of the property). Static properties are accessed by using the :: (Double Colon): self::$property. See Static Keyword for more information on the difference between static and non-static properties.

The pseudo-variable $this is available inside any class method when that method is called from within an object context. $this is a reference to the calling object (usually the object to which the method belongs, but possibly another object, if the method is called statically from the context of a secondary object).

Przykład #1 property declarations

<?php
class SimpleClass
{
   
// invalid property declarations:
   
public $var1 'hello ' 'world';
   public 
$var2 = <<<EOD
hello world
EOD;
   public 
$var3 1+2;
   public 
$var4 self::myStaticMethod();
   public 
$var5 $myVar;

   
// valid property declarations:
   
public $var6 myConstant;
   public 
$var7 = array(truefalse);

   
// This is allowed only in PHP 5.3.0 and later.
   
public $var8 = <<<'EOD'
hello world
EOD;
}
?>

Informacja:

There are some nice functions to handle classes and objects. You might want to take a look at the Class/Object Functions.

Unlike heredocs, nowdocs can be used in any static data context, including property declarations.

Przykład #2 Example of using a nowdoc to initialize a property

<?php
class foo {
   
// As of PHP 5.3.0
   
public $bar = <<<'EOT'
bar
EOT;
}
?>

Informacja:

Nowdoc support was added in PHP 5.3.0.

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User Contributed Notes 10 notes

up
51
Anonymous
2 years ago
In case this saves anyone any time, I spent ages working out why the following didn't work:

class MyClass
{
    private $foo = FALSE;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->$foo = TRUE;

        echo($this->$foo);
    }
}

$bar = new MyClass();

giving "Fatal error: Cannot access empty property in ...test_class.php on line 8"

The subtle change of removing the $ before accesses of $foo fixes this:

class MyClass
{
    private $foo = FALSE;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->foo = TRUE;

        echo($this->foo);
    }
}

$bar = new MyClass();

I guess because it's treating $foo like a variable in the first example, so trying to call $this->FALSE (or something along those lines) which makes no sense. It's obvious once you've realised, but there aren't any examples of accessing on this page that show that.
up
27
Anonymous
3 years ago
$this can be cast to array.  But when doing so, it prefixes the property names/new array keys with certain data depending on the property classification.  Public property names are not changed.  Protected properties are prefixed with a space-padded '*'.  Private properties are prefixed with the space-padded class name...

<?php

class test
{
    public
$var1 = 1;
    protected
$var2 = 2;
    private
$var3 = 3;
    static
$var4 = 4;
   
    public function
toArray()
    {
        return (array)
$this;
    }
}

$t = new test;
print_r($t->toArray());

/* outputs:

Array
(
    [var1] => 1
    [ * var2] => 2
    [ test var3] => 3
)

*/
?>

This is documented behavior when converting any object to an array (see </language.types.array.php#language.types.array.casting> PHP manual page).  All properties regardless of visibility will be shown when casting an object to array (with exceptions of a few built-in objects).

To get an array with all property names unaltered, use the 'get_object_vars($this)' function in any method within class scope to retrieve an array of all properties regardless of external visibility, or 'get_object_vars($object)' outside class scope to retrieve an array of only public properties (see: </function.get-object-vars.php> PHP manual page).
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8
Ashley Dambra
8 months ago
Updated method objectThis() to transtypage class array properties or array to stdClass.

Hope it help you.

public function objectThis($array = null) {
    if (!$array) {
        foreach ($this as $property_name => $property_values) {
            if (is_array($property_values) && !empty($property_values)) {
                $this->{$property_name} = $this->objectThis($property_values);
            } else if (is_array($property_values) && empty($property_values)) {
                $this->{$property_name} = new stdClass();
            }
        }
    } else {
        $object = new stdClass();
        foreach ($array as $index => $values) {
            if (is_array($values) && empty($values)) {
                $object->{$index} = new stdClass();
            } else if (is_array($values)) {
                $object->{$index} = $this->objectThis($values);
            } else {
                $object->{$index} = $values;
            }
        }
        return $object;
    }
}
up
15
zzzzBov
4 years ago
Do not confuse php's version of properties with properties in other languages (C++ for example).  In php, properties are the same as attributes, simple variables without functionality.  They should be called attributes, not properties.

Properties have implicit accessor and mutator functionality.  I've created an abstract class that allows implicit property functionality.

<?php

abstract class PropertyObject
{
  public function
__get($name)
  {
    if (
method_exists($this, ($method = 'get_'.$name)))
    {
      return
$this->$method();
    }
    else return;
  }
 
  public function
__isset($name)
  {
    if (
method_exists($this, ($method = 'isset_'.$name)))
    {
      return
$this->$method();
    }
    else return;
  }
 
  public function
__set($name, $value)
  {
    if (
method_exists($this, ($method = 'set_'.$name)))
    {
     
$this->$method($value);
    }
  }
 
  public function
__unset($name)
  {
    if (
method_exists($this, ($method = 'unset_'.$name)))
    {
     
$this->$method();
    }
  }
}

?>

after extending this class, you can create accessors and mutators that will be called automagically, using php's magic methods, when the corresponding property is accessed.
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1
php at webflips dot net
6 months ago
Heredoc IS valid as of PHP 5.3 and this is documented in the manual at http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.heredoc

Only heredocs containing variables are invalid because then it becomes dynamic.
up
-1
Ashley Dambra
8 months ago
Updated method objectThis() to transtypage class array properties or array to stdClass.

Hope it help you.

public function objectThis($array = null) {
    if (!$array) {
        foreach ($this as $property_name => $property_values) {
            if (is_array($property_values) && !empty($property_values)) {
                $this->{$property_name} = $this->objectThis($property_values);
            } else if (is_array($property_values) && empty($property_values)) {
                $this->{$property_name} = new stdClass();
            }
        }
    } else {
        $object = new stdClass();
        foreach ($array as $index => $values) {
            if (is_array($values) && empty($values)) {
                $object->{$index} = new stdClass();
            } else if (is_array($values)) {
                $object->{$index} = $this->objectThis($values);
            } else {
                $object->{$index} = $values;
            }
        }
        return $object;
    }
}
up
-6
vpmhieu{at}gmail.com
10 months ago
Using heredoc for property declaration is valid (tested), but the 1st example in document list it as invalid declaration.
up
-7
singhkumardinesh at gmail dot com
1 year ago
if you run this below program it will through the error. but in the example related we have shown that it is possible.

class example {
    public $public = self::getStaticFunction();
    static function getStaticFunction(){
        return 1+1;
    }
}
$obj = new example();
echo $obj->public;

ERROR:

( ! ) Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '(', expecting ',' or ';' in C:\wamp\www\php\class.php on line 3
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-13
Anonymous
4 years ago
As of PHP 5.3.0, heredocs can also be used in property declarations.

<?php
class foo {
  
// As of PHP 5.3.0
  
public $bar = <<<EOT
bar
EOT;
}
?>
up
-3
AshleyDambra at live dot com
8 months ago
Add this method to you class in order to 'transtypage' all the array properties into stdClass();

Hope it help you.

public function objectThis($object = null) {
    if (!$object) {
        foreach ($this as $property_name => $property_values) {
            if (is_array($property_values)) {
                $this->{$property_name} = $this->objectThis($property_values);
            }
        }
    } else {
        $object2 = new stdClass();
        foreach ($object as $index => $values) {
            if (is_array($values)) {
                $object2->{$index} = $this->objectThis($values);
            } else {
                $object2->{$index} = $values;
            }
        }
        return $object2;
    }
}
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