mysql_info

(PHP 4 >= 4.3.0, PHP 5)

mysql_info Liefert Informationen über die zuletzt ausgeführte Anfrage zurück

Warnung

Diese Erweiterung ist seit PHP 5.5.0 als veraltet markiert und wird in der Zukunft entfernt werden. Verwenden Sie stattdessen die Erweiterungen MySQLi oder PDO_MySQL. Weitere Informationen finden Sie im Ratgeber MySQL: Auswahl einer API und den zugehörigen FAQ. Alternativen zu dieser Funktion umfassen:

Beschreibung

string mysql_info ([ resource $link_identifier = NULL ] )

Gibt ausführliche Informationen zur letzten Abfrage zurück.

Parameter-Liste

Verbindungs-Kennung

Die MySQL-Verbindung. Wird die Verbindungskennung nicht angegeben, wird die letzte durch mysql_connect() geöffnete Verbindung angenommen. Falls keine solche Verbindung gefunden wird, wird versucht, eine Verbindung aufzubauen, wie es beim Aufruf von mysql_connect() ohne Angabe von Argumenten der Fall wäre. Falls zufällig keine Verbindung gefunden oder aufgebaut werden kann, wird eine Warnung der Stufe E_WARNING erzeugt.

Rückgabewerte

Gibt bei Erfolg Informationen über die Abfrage zurück oder FALSE bei Fehlern. Sehen sie das untenstehende Beispiel, das zeigt, welche Abfragen Informationen bereitstellen und wie der Rückgabewert aussehen kann. Nicht aufgeführte Abfragen geben FALSE zurück.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 Relevante MySQL Anweisungen

Anweisungen, die Zeichenketten zurückgeben. Die Nummern dienen nur zur Illustration; die tatsächlichen Werte entsprechen der jeweiligen Abfrage.

INSERT INTO ... SELECT ...
String format: Records: 23 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0
INSERT INTO ... VALUES (...),(...),(...)...
String format: Records: 37 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0
LOAD DATA INFILE ...
String format: Records: 42 Deleted: 0 Skipped: 0 Warnings: 0
ALTER TABLE
String format: Records: 60 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0
UPDATE
String format: Rows matched: 65 Changed: 65 Warnings: 0

Anmerkungen

Hinweis:

mysql_info() liefert bei INSERT...VALUES Befehlen nur dann einen gültigen (nicht-FALSE) Wert, wenn mehrfache Werte angegeben wurden.

Siehe auch

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 5 notes

up
2
info at granville dot nl
9 years ago
Imade a quick conversion of eric's function just to count matched or affected rows from a query.

/**GD gdf_db_count_query_v1: returns the amount of rows matched or affected by the last query. Must be used immediately after the concerned query.
*/

function gdf_db_count_query($link = 'dbh') {
      
    $info_str = mysql_info($$link);

       if (ereg("Records: ([0-9]*)", $info_str, $count) == false) {
        ereg("Rows matched: ([0-9]*)", $info_str, $count);
    }
   
    return $count;

}
up
1
bdobrica at gmail dot com
8 years ago
As a solution to the problem pointed in the post reffering to mysql_affected_rows() returning 0 when you are making an update query and the fields are not modified although the query is valid, i'm posting the following function. It is very simple and based on a previous post.

function mysql_modified_rows () {
        $info_str = mysql_info();
        $a_rows = mysql_affected_rows();
        ereg("Rows matched: ([0-9]*)", $info_str, $r_matched);
        return ($a_rows < 1)?($r_matched[1]?$r_matched[1]:0):$a_rows;
        }

Hope you'll find it usefull.
up
1
eric at projectsatellite dot com
11 years ago
I agree that this is a useful function to use when trying to check on whether an update query matched a particular row. I created a simple function that returns an associative array with the values delineated in the returned string.

function get_mysql_info($linkid = null){
    $linkid? $strInfo = mysql_info($linkid) : $strInfo = mysql_info();
   
    $return = array();
    ereg("Records: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $records);
    ereg("Duplicates: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $dupes);
    ereg("Warnings: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $warnings);
    ereg("Deleted: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $deleted);
    ereg("Skipped: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $skipped);
    ereg("Rows matched: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $rows_matched);
    ereg("Changed: ([0-9]*)", $strInfo, $changed);
   
    $return['records'] = $records[1];
    $return['duplicates'] = $dupes[1];
    $return['warnings'] = $warnings[1];
    $return['deleted'] = $deleted[1];
    $return['skipped'] = $skipped[1];
    $return['rows_matched'] = $rows_matched[1];
    $return['changed'] = $changed[1];
   
    return $return;
}

After trying to update a row that may or may not exist, you can use the above function like so:

$vals = get_mysql_info($linkid);
if($vals['rows_matched'] == 0){
     mysql_query("INSERT INTO table values('val1','val2', 'valetc')", $linkid);
}
up
2
tomas at matfyz dot cz
5 years ago
Please note that the information on warning count cannot be taken from the mysql_info() due to mysql bugs #41283 and #41285:

http://bugs.mysql.com/?id=41283
http://bugs.mysql.com/?id=41285
up
-2
carl at NOSPAMthep dot lu dot se
12 years ago
This function can be used as a workaround for a misfeature of MySQL: on an UPDATE, rows that aren't updated _solely because they looked the same before_ will not be seen in mysql_affected_rows(). This causes problems when you want to use the result of the update to determine if there's need to do an INSERT. With MySQL you can do an INSERT IGNORE if there's no risk of if failing because of a duplicate key other than the one used in the UPDATE. However, if this isn't the case or you want a bit of RDBMS independence, there's no easy/pretty workaround. I think I'll resort to doing a SELECT to determine the primary key before doing the update/insert, as using the CVS version of PHP isn't an option for me.
To Top