PHP 5.4.36 Released

Regeln für Namensauflösung

(PHP 5 >= 5.3.0)

Hier einige wichtige Definitionen für die Zwecke der Namensauflösungsregeln:

Namespace-Namen-Definitionen
Unqualifizierter Name

Dies ist ein Bezeichner ohne einen Namespaceseparator, z.B. Foo

Qualifizierter Name

Dies ist ein Bezeichner mit einem Namespaceseparator, z.B. Foo\Bar

Vollständig qualifizierter Name

Dies ist ein Bezeichner mit einem Namespaceseparator, der mit einem Namespaceseparator beginnt, z.B. \Foo\Bar. Der Namespace namespace\Foo ist ebenfalls ein vollständig qualifizierter Name.

Namen werden gemäß den folgenden Regeln aufgelöst:

  1. Aufrufe von vollständig qualifizierten Funktionen, Klassen oder Konstanten werden zur Kompilierungszeit aufgelöst. new \A\B wird z.B. zur Klasse A\B aufgelöst.
  2. Alle unqualifizierten und qualifizierten Namen (nicht vollständig qualifizierte Namen) werden gemäß den aktuellen Importen zur Kompilierungszeit übersetzt. Wenn zum Beispiel der namespace A\B\C als C importiert wurde, so wird ein Aufruf von C\D\e() zu A\B\C\D\e() übersetzt.
  3. Innerhalb eines Namespace wird allen qualifizierten Namen, die noch nicht gemäß den Importregeln übersetzt wurden, der aktuelle Namespace vorangestellt. Wenn z.B. C\D\e() innerhalb des Namespace A\B aufgerufen wird, so wird dies zu A\B\C\D\e() übersetzt.
  4. Unqualifizierte Klassennamen werden zur Kompilierungszeit gemäß der aktuellen Importregeln (vollständige Namen ersetzt durch kurze Aliasnamen) übersetzt. Z.B. wenn der Namespace A\B\C als C importiert wurde, so wird new C() zu new A\B\C() übersetzt.
  5. Innerhalb eines Namespace (z.B. A\B) werden Aufrufe von unqualifizierten Funktionen zur Laufzeit aufgelöst. Der Aufruf der Funktion foo() wird wie folgt aufgelöst:
    1. Zuerst wird nach der Funktion im aktuellen Namespace gesucht: A\B\foo().
    2. Es wird versucht, die Funktion foo() im globalen Namensraum zu finden.
  6. Innerhalb eines Namespace (z.B. A\B) werden Aufrufe von unqualifizierten oder qualifizierten Klassennamen (nicht vollständig qualifizierte Klassennamen) zur Laufzeit aufgelöst. Der Aufruf von new C() oder new D\E() wird wir folgt aufgelöst. Für new C():
    1. Zuerst wird nach der Klasse im aktuellen Namespace gesucht: A\B\C.
    2. Es wird versucht, die Klasse A\B\C mittels Autoload zu laden.
    Für new D\E():
    1. Es wird nach der Klasse gesucht, indem der aktuelle Namespace vorangestellt wird: A\B\D\E.
    2. Es wird versucht, die Klasse A\B\D\E mittels Autoload zu laden.
    Um auf eine globale Klasse im globalen Namespace zuzugreifen, muss deren vollständig qualifizierter Name new \C() verwendet werden.

Beispiel #1 Illustration der Namensauflösung

<?php
namespace A;
use 
B\DC\as F;

// Funktionsaufrufe

foo();      // versucht zuerst die Funktion "foo" im Namespace "A" aufzurufen
            // danach wird die globale Funktion "foo" aufgerufen

\foo();     // ruft die Funktion "foo" im globalen Namensraum auf

my\foo();   // ruft die Funktion "foo" im Namespace "A\my" auf

F();        // versucht zuerst die Funktion "F" im Namespace "A" aufzurufen,
            // danach wird die globale Funktion "F" aufgerufen

// Klassenreferenzen

new B();    // erzeugt ein Objekt der Klasse "B" im Namespace "A"
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "A\B" zu laden

new D();    // gemäß den Importregeln wird ein Objekt der Klasse "D"
            //  aus dem Namenspace "B" erzeugt
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "B\D" zu laden

new F();    // gemäß den Importregeln wird ein Objekt der Klasse "E"
            //  aus dem Namespace "C" erzeugt
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "C\E" zu laden

new \B();   // erzeugt ein Objekt der Klasse "B" aus dem globalen Namensraum
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "B" zu laden

new \D();   // erzeugt ein Objekt der Klasse "D" aus dem globalen Namensraum
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "D" zu laden

new \F();   // erzeugt ein Objekt der Klasse "F" aus dem globalen Namensraum
            // wenn diese Klasse nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht per
            //  Autoload die Klasse "F" zu laden

// statische Methoden und Funktionen mit Namespace aus anderen Namespaces

B\foo();    // ruft die Funktion "foo" aus dem Namensraum "A\B" auf

B::foo();   // ruft die Methode "foo" der Klasse "B" im Namensraum "A" auf
            // wenn die Klasse "A\B" nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht
            //  die Klasse "A\B" mittels Autoload zu laden

D::foo();   // ruft gemäß den Importregeln die Methode "foo" der Klasse "D"
            //  im Namensraum "B" auf
            // wenn die Klasse "B\D" nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht
            //  die Klasse "B\D" mittels Autoload zu laden

\B\foo();   // ruft die Funktion "foo" im Namespace "B" auf

\B::foo();  // ruft die Methode "foo" der Klasse "B" im
           //   globalen Namensraum auf
            // wenn die Klasse "B" nicht bekannt ist, so wird versucht
            //  die Klasse "B" mittels Autoload zu laden

// statische Methoden und Funktionen mit Namespace aus den gleichen Namespaces

A\B::foo();   // ruft die Methode "foo" der Klasse "B" aus dem Namespace "A\A" auf
              // wenn die Klasse "A\A\B" nicht bekannt ist, so wird
              //  versucht die Klasse "A\A\B" mittels Autoload zu laden

\A\B::foo();  // ruft die Methode "foo" der Klasse "B" aus dem Namespace "A" auf
              // wenn die Klasse "A\B" nicht bekannt ist, so wird
              //  versucht die Klasse "A\B" mittels Autoload zu laden
?>
add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 8 notes

up
12
kdimi
4 years ago
If you like to declare an __autoload function within a namespace or class, use the spl_autoload_register() function to register it and it will work fine.
up
10
rangel
5 years ago
The term "autoload" mentioned here shall not be confused with __autoload function to autoload objects. Regarding the __autoload and namespaces' resolution I'd like to share the following experience:

->Say you have the following directory structure:

- root
      | - loader.php
      | - ns
             | - foo.php

->foo.php

<?php
namespace ns;
class
foo
{
    public
$say;
   
    public function
__construct()
    {
       
$this->say = "bar";
    }
   
}
?>

-> loader.php

<?php
//GLOBAL SPACE <--
function __autoload($c)
{
    require_once
$c . ".php";
}

class
foo extends ns\foo // ns\foo is loaded here
{
    public function
__construct()
    {
       
parent::__construct();
        echo
"<br />foo" . $this->say;
    }
}
$a = new ns\foo(); // ns\foo also loads ns/foo.php just fine here.
echo $a->say;   // prints bar as expected.
$b = new foo// prints foobar just fine.
?>

If you keep your directory/file matching namespace/class consistence the object __autoload works fine.
But... if you try to give loader.php a namespace you'll obviously get fatal errors.
My sample is just 1 level dir, but I've tested with a very complex and deeper structure. Hope anybody finds this useful.

Cheers!
up
3
safakozpinar at NOSPAM dot gmail dot com
4 years ago
As working with namespaces and using (custom or basic) autoload structure; magic function __autoload must be defined in global scope, not in a namespace, also not in another function or method.

<?php
namespace Glue {
   
/**
     * Define your custom structure and algorithms
     * for autoloading in this class.
     */
   
class Import
   
{
        public static function
load ($classname)
        {
            echo
'Autoloading class '.$classname."\n";
            require_once
$classname.'.php';
        }
    }
}

/**
* Define function __autoload in global namespace.
*/
namespace {
   
    function
__autoload ($classname)
    {
        \
Glue\Import::load($classname);
    }

}
?>
up
2
Kavoir.com
11 months ago
For point 4, "In example, if the namespace A\B\C is imported as C" should be "In example, if the class A\B\C is imported as C".
up
0
llmll
1 day ago
The mentioned filesystem analogy fails at an important point:

Namespace resolution *only* works at declaration time. The compiler fixates all namespace/class references as absolute paths, like creating absolute symlinks.

You can't expect relative symlinks, which should be evaluated during access -> during PHP runtime.

In other words, namespaces are evaluated like __CLASS__ or self:: at parse-time. What's *not* happening, is the pendant for late static binding like static:: which resolves to the current class at runtime.

So you can't do the following:

namespace Alpha;
class Helper {
    public static $Value = "ALPHA";
}
class Base {
    public static function Write() {
        echo Helper::$Value;
    }
}

namespace Beta;
class Helper extends \Alpha\Helper {
    public static $Value = 'BETA';
}   
class Base extends \Alpha\Base {}   

\Beta\Base::Write(); // should write "BETA" as this is the executing namespace context at runtime.

If you copy the write() function into \Beta\Base it works as expected.
up
0
dn dot permyakov at gmail dot com
5 months ago
Can someone explain to me -  why do we need p.4 if we have p.2 (which covers both unqualified and qualified names)?
up
-1
rangel
5 years ago
The term "autoload" mentioned here shall not be confused with __autoload function to autoload objects. Regarding the __autoload and namespaces' resolution I'd like to share the following experience:

->Say you have the following directory structure:

- root
      | - loader.php
      | - ns
             | - foo.php

->foo.php

<?php
namespace ns;
class
foo
{
    public
$say;
   
    public function
__construct()
    {
       
$this->say = "bar";
    }
   
}
?>

-> loader.php

<?php
//GLOBAL SPACE <--
function __autoload($c)
{
    require_once
$c . ".php";
}

class
foo extends ns\foo // ns\foo is loaded here
{
    public function
__construct()
    {
       
parent::__construct();
        echo
"<br />foo" . $this->say;
    }
}
$a = new ns\foo(); // ns\foo also loads ns/foo.php just fine here.
echo $a->say;   // prints bar as expected.
$b = new foo// prints foobar just fine.
?>

If you keep your directory/file matching namespace/class consistence the object __autoload works fine.
But... if you try to give loader.php a namespace you'll obviously get fatal errors.
My sample is just 1 level dir, but I've tested with a very complex and deeper structure. Hope anybody finds this useful.

Cheers!
up
-2
CJ Taylor
10 months ago
It took me playing with it a bit  as I had a hard time finding documentation on when a class name matches a namespace, if that's even legal and what behavior to expect.  It IS explained in #6 but I thought I'd share this with other souls like me that see it better by example.  Assume all 3 files below are in the same directory.

file1.php
<?php
namespace foo;

class
foo {
  static function
hello() {
    echo
"hello world!";
  }
}
?>

file2.php
<?php
namespace foo;
include(
'file1.php');

foo::hello(); //you're in the same namespace, or scope.
\foo\foo::hello(); //called on a global scope.
?>

file3.php
<?php
include('file1.php');

foo\foo::hello(); //you're outside of the namespace
\foo\foo::hello(); //called on a global scope.
?>

Depending upon what you're building (example: a module, plugin, or package on a larger application), sometimes declaring a class that matches a namespace makes sense or may even be required.  Just be aware that if you try to reference any class that shares the same namespace, omit the namespace unless you do it globally like the examples above.

I hope this is useful, particularly for those that are trying to wrap your head around this 5.3 feature.
To Top