mysqli_stmt::bind_param

mysqli_stmt_bind_param

(PHP 5)

mysqli_stmt::bind_param -- mysqli_stmt_bind_paramPassa variáveis para um preparado comando como parâmetros

Descrição

Modo orientado a objeto (método):

bool mysqli_stmt::bind_param ( string $types , mixed &$var1 [, mixed &$... ] )

Modo procedural:

bool mysqli_stmt_bind_param ( mysqli_stmt $stmt , string $types , mixed &$var1 [, mixed &$... ] )

Passa variáveis para marcadores de parâmetros no comando SQL que foi passado para mysqli_prepare().

Nota:

Se o tamanho da informação da variáveis excede o máximo permitido do tamanho de pacote (max_allowed_packet), você deve especificar b no types e usar mysqli_stmt_send_long_data() para enviar a informação em pacotes.

Parâmetros

stmt

Procedural style only: A statement identifier returned by mysqli_stmt_init().

types

A string que contém um ou mais caracteres que especifica os tipos para as correspondente variáveis passadas:

Caracteres de especificação de tipo
Caractere Descrição
i corresponde a uma variável de tipo inteiro
d corresponde a uma variável de tipo double
s corresponde a uma variável de tipo string
b corresponde a uma variável que contém dados para um blob e enviará em pacotes

var1

O número de variáveis e tamanho da string types precisa combinar com os parâmetros no comando.

Valor Retornado

Retorna TRUE em caso de sucesso ou FALSE em caso de falha.

Exemplos

Exemplo #1 Modo orientado a objeto

<?php
$mysqli 
= new mysqli('localhost''my_user''my_password''world');

/* check connection */
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

$stmt $mysqli->prepare("INSERT INTO CountryLanguage VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?)");
$stmt->bind_param('sssd'$code$language$official$percent);

$code 'DEU';
$language 'Bavarian';
$official "F";
$percent 11.2;

/* execute prepared statement */
$stmt->execute();

printf("%d Row inserted.\n"$stmt->affected_rows);

/* close statement and connection */
$stmt->close();

/* Clean up table CountryLanguage */
$mysqli->query("DELETE FROM CountryLanguage WHERE Language='Bavarian'");
printf("%d Row deleted.\n"$mysqli->affected_rows);

/* close connection */
$mysqli->close();
?>

Exemplo #2 Modo procedural

<?php
$link 
mysqli_connect('localhost''my_user''my_password''world');

/* check connection */
if (!$link) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

$stmt mysqli_prepare($link"INSERT INTO CountryLanguage VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?)");
mysqli_stmt_bind_param($stmt'sssd'$code$language$official$percent);

$code 'DEU';
$language 'Bavarian';
$official "F";
$percent 11.2;

/* execute prepared statement */
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

printf("%d Row inserted.\n"mysqli_stmt_affected_rows($stmt));

/* close statement and connection */
mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);

/* Clean up table CountryLanguage */
mysqli_query($link"DELETE FROM CountryLanguage WHERE Language='Bavarian'");
printf("%d Row deleted.\n"mysqli_affected_rows($link));

/* close connection */
mysqli_close($link);
?>

O exemplo acima irá imprimir:

1 Row inserted.
1 Row deleted.

Veja Também

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 39 notes

up
20
jk at jankriedner dot de
3 years ago
There are some things to note when working with mysqli::bind_param() and array-elements.
Re-assigning an array will break any references, no matter if the keys are identical.
You have to explicitly reassign every single value in an array, for the references to be kept.
Best shown in an example:
<?php
function getData() {
    return array(
       
0=>array(
           
"name"=>"test_0",
           
"email"=>"test_0@example.com"
       
),
       
1=>array(
           
"name"=>"test_1",
           
"email"=>"test_1@example.com"
       
)
    );
}
$db  = new mysqli("localhost","root","","tests");
$sql = "INSERT INTO `user` SET `name`=?,`email`=?";
$res = $db->prepare($sql);
// If you bind array-elements to a prepared statement, the array has to be declared first with the used keys:
$arr = array("name"=>"","email"=>"");
$res->bind_param("ss",$arr['name'],$arr['email']);
//So far the introduction...

/*
    Example 1 (wont work as expected, creates two empty entries)
    Re-assigning the array in the while()-head generates a new array, whereas references from bind_param stick to the old array
*/
foreach( getData() as $arr ) {
   
$res->execute();
}

/*
    Example 2 (will work as expected)
    Re-assigning every single value explicitly keeps the references alive
*/
foreach( getData() as $tempArr ) {
    foreach(
$tempArr as $k=>$v) {
       
$arr[$k] = $v;
    }
   
$res->execute();
}
?>

Coming to the problem calling mysqli::bind_param() with a dynamic number of arguments via call_user_func_array() with PHP Version 5.3+, there's another workaround besides using an extra function to build the references for the array-elements.
You can use Reflection to call mysqli::bind_param(). When using PHP 5.3+ this saves you about 20-40% Speed compared to passing the array to your own reference-builder-function.
Example:
<?php
$db    
= new mysqli("localhost","root","","tests");
$res    = $db->prepare("INSERT INTO test SET foo=?,bar=?");
$refArr = array("si","hello",42);
$ref    = new ReflectionClass('mysqli_stmt');
$method = $ref->getMethod("bind_param");
$method->invokeArgs($res,$refArr);
$res->execute(); 
?>
up
10
Anonymous
3 years ago
Blob and null handling aside, a couple of notes on how param values are automatically converted and forwarded on to the Mysql engine based on your type string argument:

1) PHP will automatically convert the value behind the scenes to the underlying type corresponding to your binding type string.  i.e.:

<?php

$var
= true;
bind_param('i', $var); // forwarded to Mysql as 1

?>

2) Though PHP numbers cannot be reliably cast to (int) if larger than PHP_INT_MAX, behind the scenes, the value will be converted anyway to at most long long depending on the size.  This means that keeping in mind precision limits and avoiding manually casting the variable to (int) first, you can still use the 'i' binding type for larger numbers.  i.e.:

<?php

$var
= '429496729479896';
bind_param('i', $var); // forwarded to Mysql as 429496729479900

?>

3) You can default to 's' for most parameter arguments in most cases.  The value will then be automatically cast to string on the back-end before being passed to the Mysql engine.  Mysql will then perform its own conversions with values it receives from PHP on execute.  This allows you to bind not only to larger numbers without concern for precision, but also to objects as long as that object has a '__toString' method.

This auto-string casting behavior greatly improves things like datetime handling.  For example: if you extended DateTime class to add a __toString method which outputs the datetime format expected by Mysql, you can just bind to that DateTime_Extended object using type 's'.  i.e.:

<?php

// DateTime_Extended has __toString defined to return the Mysql formatted datetime
$var = new DateTime_Extended;
bind_param('s', $var); // forwarded to Mysql as '2011-03-14 17:00:01'

?>
up
5
Anonymous
3 years ago
You can bind to variables with NULL values, and on update and insert queries, the corresponding field will be updated to NULL no matter what bind string type you associated it with.  But, for parameters meant for the WHERE clause (ie where field = ?), the query will have no effect and produce no results.

When comparing a value against NULL, the MYSQL syntax is either "value IS NULL" or "value IS NOT NULL".  So, you can't pass in something like "WHERE (value = ?)" and expect this to work using a null value parameter.

Instead, you can do something like this in your WHERE clause:

"WHERE (IF(ISNULL(?), field1 is null, field1 = ?))"

Then, pass in the value you want to test twice:

bind_param('ss', $value1, $value1);
up
14
nick9v at hotmail dot com
2 years ago
When dealing with a dynamic number of field values while preparing a statement I find this class useful.

<?php
class BindParam{
    private
$values = array(), $types = '';
   
    public function
add( $type, &$value ){
       
$this->values[] = $value;
       
$this->types .= $type;
    }
   
    public function
get(){
        return
array_merge(array($this->types), $this->values);
    }
}
?>

Usage is pretty simple. Create an instance and use the add method to populate. When you're ready to execute simply use the get method.

<?php
$bindParam
= new BindParam();
$qArray = array();

$use_part_1 = 1;
$use_part_2 = 1;
$use_part_3 = 1;

$query = 'SELECT * FROM users WHERE ';
if(
$use_part_1){
   
$qArray[] = 'hair_color = ?';
   
$bindParam->add('s', 'red');
}
if(
$use_part_2){
   
$qArray[] = 'age = ?';
   
$bindParam->add('i', 25);
}
if(
$use_part_3){
   
$qArray[] = 'balance = ?';
   
$bindParam->add('d', 50.00);
}

$query .= implode(' OR ', $qArray);

//call_user_func_array( array($stm, 'bind_param'), $bindParam->get());

echo $query . '<br/>';
var_dump($bindParam->get());
?>

This gets you the result that looks something like this:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE hair_color = ? OR age = ? OR balance = ?
array(4) { [0]=> string(3) "sid" [1]=> string(3) "red" [2]=> int(25) [3]=> float(50) }

[Editor's note: changed BindParam::add() to accept $value by reference and thereby prevent a warning in newer versions of PHP.]
up
8
fabio at kidopi dot com dot br
4 years ago
I used to have problems with call_user_func_array and bind_param after migrating to php 5.3.

The problem is that 5.3 requires array values as reference while 5.2 works with real values.

so i created a secondary function to help me with this...

<?php
function refValues($arr){
    if (
strnatcmp(phpversion(),'5.3') >= 0) //Reference is required for PHP 5.3+
   
{
       
$refs = array();
        foreach(
$arr as $key => $value)
           
$refs[$key] = &$arr[$key];
        return
$refs;
    }
    return
$arr;
}
?>

and changed my previous function from:

<?php
call_user_func_array
(array($this->stmt, "bind_param"),$this->valores);
?>

to:

<?php
call_user_func_array
(array($this->stmt, "bind_param"),refValues($this->valores));
?>

in this way my db functions keep working in php 5.2/5.3 servers.

I hope this help someone.
up
5
xianrenb at gmail dot com
2 years ago
It is believed that if one has specified 'b' in $types, the corresponding variable should be set to null, and one has to use mysqli_stmt::send_long_data() or mysqli_stmt_send_long_data() to send the blob, otherwise the blob value would be treated as empty.
up
2
rejohns at nOsPaMpost dot harvard dot edu
4 years ago
You can, in fact, use mysqli_bind_parameter to pass a NULL value to the database. simply create a variable and store the NULL value (see the manpage for it) to the variable and bind that. Works great for me anyway.
up
3
Guido
2 years ago
Dear all,

I was searching for a class which supports multiple calls to bind_param, because I have scenarios where I build huge SQL statements over different functions with variable numbers of parameters. But I didn't found one. So I have just written up this little piece of code I would like to share with you. There is enough room to optimize these classes, but it shows the general idea. And for me it works. In mbind_param_do() it seems to depend from the PHP version if makeValuesReferenced() must be used or if $params can be used directly. In my case I have to use it.

The cool thing about this solution: You don't have to care about a lot if you are using my mbind_ functions or not. You may also use default bind_param and the execute will still work.

<?php

class db extends mysqli {
    public function
prepare($query) {
        return new
stmt($this,$query);
    }
}

class
stmt extends mysqli_stmt {
    public function
__construct($link, $query) {
       
$this->mbind_reset();
       
parent::__construct($link, $query);
    }

    public function
mbind_reset() {
        unset(
$this->mbind_params);
        unset(
$this->mbind_types);
       
$this->mbind_params = array();
       
$this->mbind_types = array();
    }
   
   
//use this one to bind params by reference
   
public function mbind_param($type, &$param) {
       
$this->mbind_types[0].= $type;
       
$this->mbind_params[] = &$param;
    }
   
   
//use this one to bin value directly, can be mixed with mbind_param()
   
public function mbind_value($type, $param) {
       
$this->mbind_types[0].= $type;
       
$this->mbind_params[] = $param;
    }
   
   
    public function
mbind_param_do() {
       
$params = array_merge($this->mbind_types, $this->mbind_params);
        return
call_user_func_array(array($this, 'bind_param'), $this->makeValuesReferenced($params));
    }
   
    private function
makeValuesReferenced($arr){
       
$refs = array();
        foreach(
$arr as $key => $value)
       
$refs[$key] = &$arr[$key];
        return
$refs;

    }
   
    public function
execute() {
        if(
count($this->mbind_params))
           
$this->mbind_param_do();
           
        return
parent::execute();
    }
   
    private
$mbind_types = array();
    private
$mbind_params = array();
}

$search1 = "test1";
$search2 = "test2";

$_db = new db("host","user","pass","database");
$query = "SELECT name FROM table WHERE col1=? AND col2=?";
$stmt = $_db->prepare($query);

$stmt->mbind_param('s',$search1);
//this second call is the cool thing!!!
$stmt->mbind_param('s',$search2);

$stmt->execute();

//this would still work!
//$search1 = "test1changed";
//$search2 = "test2changed";
//$stmt->execute();

...

$stmt->store_result();
$stmt->bind_result(...);
$stmt->fetch();
?>
up
3
tasdildiren at gmail dot com
5 years ago
<?php
/* just explaining how to call mysqli_stmt_bind_param with a parameter array */

$sql_link = mysqli_connect('localhost', 'my_user', 'my_password', 'world');
$type = "isssi";
$param = array("5", "File Description", "File Title", "Original Name", time());
$sql = "INSERT INTO file_detail (file_id, file_description, file_title, file_original_name, file_upload_date) VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?, ?)";
$sql_stmt = mysqli_prepare ($sql_link, $sql);
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param', array_merge (array($sql_stmt, $type), $param);
mysqli_stmt_execute($sql_stmt);
?>
up
1
robstocki at battlesecure dot com
2 years ago
Here is the procedural version of a select statement when wanting to use %LIKE% in the query and not an '=':
<?php
function db_connect(){
//    set $db as global for access outside function
   
global $db;
   
#    Use procedural methods for database connection and manipulation
//    Connect to Database
   
@$db = mysqli_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_NAME);

//    Check connection
   
if(mysqli_connect_errno()) {
        echo
'<br />Error: Could not connect to database.  Please try again later.<br />';
        exit;
    }
   
}

//    Connect to Database
   
db_connect();
    
   
$theRecordInTheTableIs = "%".$_POST['theRecordInTheTableIs']."%";    //    concat $_POST variable with % on each side for use in prepared statement
   
$theRelatedRecordLooks = "%".$_POST['theRelatedRecordLooks']."%";    //    concat $_POST variable with % on each side for use in prepared statement
   

//    Create Query
   
$q      =     '';        //    create variable for input
   
$q     .=     " SELECT ";
   
$q     .=     " * ";
   
$q     .=     " FROM ";
   
$q     .=     " myFavTable ";
   
$q     .=     " WHERE ";
   
$q    .=     " theRecordInTheTableIs LIKE ? ";
   
$q    .=     " AND ";
   
$q    .=     " theRelatedRecordLooks LIKE ? ";
   
//    Prepare the statement
   
$stmt = mysqli_prepare($db, $q);

//    bind the paramaters
   
mysqli_stmt_bind_param($stmt, 'ss', $theRecordInTheTableIs,$theRelatedRecordLooks);   
                                                           
//    Execute the query                                                                               
   
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

// bind result variables 
   
mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt, $col0, $col1, $col2, $col3, $col4, $col5, $col6, $col7, $col8, $col9, $col10);

   
//    Display the query
//    start the table

echo '<table>
    <tr>
        <td>Col0 Title</td>
        <td>Col1 Title</td>
        <td>Col2 Title</td>
        <td>Col3 Title</td>
        <td>Col4 Title</td>
        <td>Col5 Title</td>
        <td>Col6 Title</td>
        <td>Col7 Title</td>
        <td>Col8 Title</td>
        <td>Col9 Title</td>
        <td>Col10 Title</td>
    </tr>'
;

// fetch values
   
while (mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)) {
        echo
"     <tr>
        <td>
{$col0}</td>
        <td>
{$col1}</td>
        <td>
{$col2}</td>
        <td>
{$col3}</td>
        <td>
{$col4}</td>
        <td>
{$col5}</td>
        <td>
{$col6}</td>
        <td>
{$col7}</td>
        <td>
{$col8}</td>
        <td>
{$col9}</td>
        <td>
{$col10}</td>
    </tr> "
;       
   
    }


//    close the table
   
echo '</table>';

?>
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1
canche_x at yahoo dot com
4 years ago
Hi, I just write a function to do all my sql statements based on all the others comments in this page, maybe it can be useful for someone else :)

Usage:

execSQL($sql, $parameters, $close);

$sql = Statement to execute;
$parameters = array of type and values of the parameters (if any)
$close = true to close $stmt (in inserts) false to return an array with the values;

Examples:

execSQL("SELECT * FROM table WHERE id = ?", array('i', $id), false);

execSQL("SELECT * FROM table", array(), false);

execSQL("INSERT INTO table(id, name) VALUES (?,?)", array('ss', $id, $name), true);

<?php

function execSQL($sql, $params, $close){
          
$mysqli = new mysqli("localhost", "user", "pass", "db");
          
          
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare($sql) or die ("Failed to prepared the statement!");
          
          
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_param'), refValues($params));
          
          
$stmt->execute();
          
           if(
$close){
              
$result = $mysqli->affected_rows;
           } else {
              
$meta = $stmt->result_metadata();
           
               while (
$field = $meta->fetch_field() ) {
                  
$parameters[] = &$row[$field->name];
               } 
       
           
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_result'), refValues($parameters));
              
            while (
$stmt->fetch() ) { 
              
$x = array(); 
               foreach(
$row as $key => $val ) { 
                 
$x[$key] = $val
               } 
              
$results[] = $x
            }

           
$result = $results;
           }
          
          
$stmt->close();
          
$mysqli->close();
          
           return 
$result;
   }
  
    function
refValues($arr){
        if (
strnatcmp(phpversion(),'5.3') >= 0) //Reference is required for PHP 5.3+
       
{
           
$refs = array();
            foreach(
$arr as $key => $value)
               
$refs[$key] = &$arr[$key];
            return
$refs;
        }
        return
$arr;
    }
?>

Regards
up
1
Ole Clausen
3 years ago
A lot of newcommers to mysqli find it hard to get started. I have written this wrapper with object based response, that handles most of my queries. I hope it'll be usefull for others as well:

<?php
define
('DB_HOST', 'localhost');
define('DB_USERNAME', '');
define('DB_PASSWORD', '');
define('DB_DEFAULT_DB', 'test');

function
iQuery($sql, $arrParams, $arrBindNames=false) {
   
$result = new stdClass();
   
$mysqli = @new mysqli(DB_HOST, DB_USERNAME, DB_PASSWORD, DB_DEFAULT_DB);
    if (
mysqli_connect_errno()) {
       
$result->error = 'Connection failed: '.mysqli_connect_error();
        return
$result;
    }
    if (
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare($sql)) {
       
$method = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_param');
       
$method->invokeArgs($stmt, $arrParams);   
       
$stmt->execute();
       
$meta = $stmt->result_metadata();
        if (!
$meta) {           
           
$result->affected_rows = $stmt->affected_rows;
           
$result->insert_id = $stmt->insert_id;
        } else {
           
$stmt->store_result();
           
$params = array();
           
$row = array();
            if (
$arrBindNames) {
                for (
$i=0,$j=count($arrBindNames); $i<$j; $i++) {
                   
$params[$i] = &$row[$arrBindNames[$i]];
                }
            } else {
                while (
$field = $meta->fetch_field()) {
                   
$params[] = &$row[$field->name];
                }
            }
           
$meta->close();
           
$method = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_result');
           
$method->invokeArgs($stmt, $params);           
           
$result->rows = array();
            while (
$stmt->fetch()) {
               
$obj = new stdClass();
                foreach(
$row as $key => $val) {
                   
$obj->{$key} = $val;
                }
               
$result->rows[] = $obj;
            }
           
$stmt->free_result();
        }
       
$stmt->close();
    }
   
$mysqli->close();
    return
$result;
}

$arrParams = array('ss', $_POST['sex'], $_POST['active']);
$result = iQuery( 'SELECT * FROM `test_table` WHERE `sex`=? AND `active`=?', $arrParams);

print_r($result);
print
$result->rows[1]->first_name . " " . $result->rows[1]->last_name;
?>

If $_POST['sex'] contains 'male' and $_POST['active'] contains 'yes' - and the field names are 'id', 'first_name', 'last_name', 'sex' and 'active', the printet result may look like this:

----------------------------------------------
stdClass Object
(
    [rows] => Array
        (
            [0] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [id] => 2
                    [first_name] => Peter
                    [last_name] => Johnson
                    [sex] => male
                    [active] => yes
                )

            [1] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [id] => 5
                    [first_name] => Ole
                    [last_name] => Clausen
                    [sex] => male
                    [active] => yes
                )

        )

)
Ole Clausen
----------------------------------------------

You can also apply special field names to the response, if you use the parameter $arrBindNames:

$arrParams = array('ss', $_POST['sex'], $_POST['active']);
$arrNames = array('foo_id', 'bar_first', 'baz_last', 'foo_sex', 'bar_act');
$result = iQuery( 'SELECT * FROM `test_table` WHERE `sex`=? AND `active`=?', $arrParams, $arrNames);

- a row would then look like this:

    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [foo_id] => 2
            [bar_first] => Peter
            [baz_last] => Johnson
            [foo_sex] => male
            [bar_act] => yes
        )

The first argument 'ss' in $arrParams states, that the two following arguments are of type String. The options are 's' for String, 'i' for Integer, 'd' for Double and 'b' for Blob (sent in packages).
       
In queries, that do not return a result INSERT, UPDATE, etc. $result->affected_rows and $result->insert_id are available. Connection errors are available in $result->error. Additional error handling would be nice, but is not implemented for now. Play with the wrapper and use print_r on the result ... enjoy!

The name 'iQuery'? Well, it handles mysql*i* - and then I guess it's kind of a tribute to Mr. Jobs ... may he 'rest' in energetic, hungry foolishness  =)

==
UPDATE: 08-NOV-2011 07:19

Due to changes in PHP 5.3 I encountered a problem with 'bind_param' in my iQuery function below. The values in the passed array *must* be references. The soloution is this function:

<?php
function getRefArray($a) {
    if (
strnatcmp(phpversion(),'5.3')>=0) {
       
$ret = array();
        foreach(
$a as $key => $val) {
           
$ret[$key] = &$a[$key];
        }
        return
$ret;
    }
    return
$a;
}
?>

- and this change in iQuery:

        if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare($sql)) {
            $arrParams = getRefArray($arrParams); // <-- Added due to changes since PHP 5.3
            $method = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_param');
            $method->invokeArgs($stmt, $arrParams);   
            $stmt->execute();
            $meta = $stmt->result_metadata();
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2
markac
9 months ago
Sprintf parameter binding style:

<?php

 
class MySqliDecorator {
    private
$db;
    private
$map = array(
     
'%d' => 'i', //integer
     
'%f' => 'd', //float
     
'%s' => 's', //string
   
);
   
    public function
__construct(mysqli $db) {
     
$this->db = $db;
    }
       
    public function
prepare($query, &$params = array()) {
     
$expr = '/(' . implode('|', array_keys($this->map)) . ')/';

      if (
preg_match_all($expr, $query, $matches)) {
       
$types = implode('', $matches[0]);       
       
$types = strtr($types, $this->map);

       
$query = preg_replace($expr, '?', $query);
       
        if (
$stmt = $this->db->prepare($query)) {       
         
array_unshift($params, $types);

          if (
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_param'), &$params)) {
             return
$stmt;
          } else {
             return
false;
          }
       
        } else {
          return
false;
        }

      } else {
        return
$this->db->prepare($query);
      }
    }

  }
?>

Using:

<?php
  $db
= new mysqli(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASS, DB_NAME);
 
$stmt = new MySqliDecorator($db);
 
 
$params = array(1, 'johny');
 
$stmt = $stmt->prepare('SELECT * FROM users WHERE Id = %d OR Username = %s', $params);
 
$stmt->execute();
?>

Be careful when using % with LIKE and so on.
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2
Ray.Paseur uses Gmail
1 year ago
It may seem obvious, but it's worth noting that variables must exist before you can bind them. This example worked well for me (line 12).

<?php
$test_names_arrays
= array
( array(
"fname" => "Walter" , "lname" => "Williams" )
, array(
"fname" => "Ray"    , "lname" => "Paseur"   )
, array(
"fname" => "Bill"   , "lname" => "O'Reilly" )
)
;
$sql = "INSERT INTO my_table ( fname, lname ) VALUES ( ?,? )";
$ins = $mysqli->prepare($sql);

// NB: THESE VARIABLES MUST EXIST BEFORE THEY CAN BE BOUND!
$person = current($test_names_arrays);

$ins->bind_param('ss', $person['fname'], $person['lname']);
foreach (
$test_names_arrays as $person)
{
   
$ins->execute();
}
?>
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1
tomasz at marcinkowski dot pl
8 months ago
When trying to bind a string param you get a "Number of variables doesn't match number of parameters in prepared statement" error, make sure you're not wrapping the question mark with quotes.

By mistake I had a query like:
SELECT something FROM table WHERE param_name = "?"

Binding it with <?php $stmt->bind('s', $param_value); ?> had been failing on me. All I had to do was to remove quotes around "?".
Hope this saves someone's time.
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1
asb(.d o,t )han(a t)n i h e i(d.o_t)dk
3 years ago
It should be noted that MySQL has some issues regarding the use of the IN clause in prepared statements.

I.e. the code:
<?php

$idArr
= "1, 2, 3, 4";
$int_one = 1;
$int_two = 2;
$int_three = 3;
$int_four = 4;

$db = new MySQLi();
$bad_stmt = $db->prepare(SELECT `idAsLetters` FROM `tbl` WHERE `id` IN(?));
$bad_stmt->bind_param("s", $idArr);
$bad_stmt->bind_result($ias);
$bad_stmt->execute();

echo
"Bad results:" . PHP_EOL;
while(
$stmt->fetch()){
   echo
$ias . PHP_EOL;
}

$good_stmt->close();

$good_stmt = $db->prepare(SELECT `idAsLetters` FROM `tbl` WHERE `id` IN(?, ?, ?, ?));
$good_stmt->bind_param("iiii", $int_one, $int_two, $int_three, $int_four);
$good_stmt->bind_result($ias);
$good_stmt->execute();

echo
"God results:" . PHP_EOL;
while(
$stmt->fetch()){
   echo
$ias . PHP_EOL;
}
$bad_stmt->close();

$db->close();
?>
will print this result:

Bad results:
one

Good results:
one
two
three
four

Using "IN(?)" in a prepared statement will return just one (the first) row from a table/view. This is not an error in PHP, but merely how MySQL handles prepared statements.
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1
user at mail dot com
3 years ago
I had a problem with the LIKE operator

This code did not work:

<?php
$test
= $sql->prepare("SELECT name FROM names WHERE name LIKE %?%");
$test->bind_param("s", $myname);
?>

The solution is:

<?php
$test
= $sql->prepare("SELECT name FROM names WHERE name LIKE ?");
$param = "%" . $myname . "%";
$test->bind_param("s", $param);
?>
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0
jmdoren at ok dot cl
7 months ago
I just wrote a function to bind a variable number of parameters

function bind_param_array( $stmt,  $types,  $vars ){
/* ------------------------------------------------------------------------ */
    $php_command = '$stmt->bind_param( $types';
    for( $i=0;$i<count($vars);$i++)
    {
        $php_command .= ',$vars['.$i.']';
    }
    $php_command .= ');';
    return eval( $php_command );
}

yo can use it like this

$params = array( "one", "two", "two again" );
$types      =  str_repeat( 's', count( $params );
$stmt        =  $MysqliObject->prepare( $query );
bind_param_array( $stmt, $types,$params);

enjoy it!
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0
Boyet
1 year ago
I think this is a good way to automatically get the types for the binding in as few lines of code as possible. If you bind the array values in the same order as when you used it for this you should not worry about aligning them.

foreach($array as $var){
    $chrType = substr((string)gettype($var),0,1);
    $strType .= (!in_array($chrType,array("i","d","s"))) ? "b" : $chrType;
}
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0
laurence dot mackenzie at stream dot com
1 year ago
I just came across a very strange behaviour when using bind_param() with a reflection class.  I figured I ought to post it here to save anyone else who comes across it from banging their head against their desk for an hour (as I just did).

First, some background:  I have a set of classes,  one per file format (i.e. CSV, HTML table, etc), which import data from flat files to a temporary table in my database.  The class then transforms the data to 3NF.

I'm  using a reflection class to pass an array to mysqli->bind_param() because the column counts and types are variable.  The code (simplified) I am having issues with is:

<?php

/* Code that loops through the rows and columns in the
* flat file and appends the MySQLi 'type' letter to the
* $typeString variable and appends the actual value
* to the $data array.  I left the code out because it's
* (probably) not relevant and would bloat the post.
*/
$stmtInsert = $db->prepare('INSERT.....');
$typeString = 'ississis';
$data = array(1, 'two', 'three', 4, 'five', 'six', 7, 'eight');

/* Here's where the actual strangeness starts happening
*/

// Merge the parameter types with the parameter values
$data = array_merge((array) $typeString, $data);

// Create the reflection class
$ref = new \ReflectionClass('mysqli_stmt');

// Get the bind_param  method
$method = $ref->getMethod('bind_param');

// Invoke it with $data
$method->invokeArgs($stmtInsert, $data);

// Execute the statement
$stmtInsert->execute();

}
?>

Oddly, in one (and only one) case it started throwing "Warning: Parameter 41 to mysqli_stmt::bind_param() expected to be a reference, value given".  The reflection class throws an exception.  Other import sets using this code work just fine.  Parameter 41 is the last parameter.   Changing the affected code as follows resolves the issue:

<?php

$ref
= new \ReflectionClass("mysqli_stmt");
$method = $ref->getMethod("bind_param");
$data[count($data)-1] = (string) $data[count($data)-1];
$method->invokeArgs($stmtInsert, $data);
$stmtInsert->execute();

?>

Not sure what's going on here, but like I said, hopefully this will keep the next person from thinking they're totally insane.
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1
Kai Sellgren
5 years ago
A few notes on this function.

If you specify type "i" (integer), the maximum value it allows you to have is 2^32-1 or 2147483647. So, if you are using UNSIGNED INTEGER or BIGINT in your database, then you are better off using "s" (string) for this.

Here's a quick summary:
(UN)SIGNED TINYINT: I
(UN)SIGNED SMALLINT: I
(UN)SIGNED MEDIUMINT: I
SIGNED INT: I
UNSIGNED INT: S
(UN)SIGNED BIGINT: S

(VAR)CHAR, (TINY/SMALL/MEDIUM/BIG)TEXT/BLOB should all have S.

FLOAT/REAL/DOUBLE (PRECISION) should all be D.

That advice was for MySQL. I have not looked into other database software.
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0
mike chip
1 year ago
I had to do a more advanced prepare function (A multi-multi values prepared statement)to make things easier for a few situations, so I wrote the following function.

NOTE: This function assumes you have put it into a class that have:
$mysqli = A mysqli object

NOTE2: This function currently only supports ints for the values, but you can modify it to support additional types...

To use it:
<?php
$sql
= "SELECT id, code FROM country";
$result = $database->fetch_all($sql); // This is just a custom fetch_all function...

if(!$result) {
    return
null; // no results...
}

// Re-organize the order of the elements from the resultset, code first then id, just like the sql statement...
$pData = array();
foreach(
$result as $row) {
   
$pData[] = array('code'=>$row['code'] + 1,'id'=>$row['id']); //Assign valid php variable names, because this'll be used later on!!!
}

$database->mysqli_prepare_exec("UPDATE country SET code=? WHERE id=?", 'ii', $pData);
?>

Here's the function:

<?php
public function mysqli_prepare_exec($sql, $types, $data)
{
   
$stm = $this->mysqli->prepare($sql);

    if(!
$stm) {
        return
null; // Statement couldn't be prepared, check for errors...
   
}

    foreach(
$data[0] as $k => $v) {
        eval(
'$' . $k . '=' . $v . ';');
        eval(
'$vars[\'' . $k . '\'] = &$' . $k . ';'); // Referencing to our last newly created variable
   
}
    unset(
$k,$v);

   
call_user_func_array(array($stm, 'bind_param'), array_merge(array($types), $vars));

    foreach(
$data as $row) {
        foreach(
$row as $k => $v) {
            eval(
'$' . $k . '=' . $v . ';');
        }
       
$stm->execute();
    }
}
?>
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0
ellert at _spam_ vankoperen _spam_ dot nl
2 years ago
Dont forget that in the query that you are preparing you do NOT need quotes around string values.
If you put them there anyway, you will get:
mysqli_stmt_bind_param(): Number of variables doesn't match number of parameters in prepared statement
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1
michael dot martinek at gmail dot com
6 years ago
I've found that you can't pass NULL values in using mysql_stmt_bind_param. Recently I ran into this problem because I wrote some MySQL routines that would update existing data, but only when the value wasn't NULL.

My solution to work around this is simple:

<?php

function preparse_prepared($sQuery, &$saParams)
{
   
$nPos = 0;

   
$sRetval = $sQuery;
    foreach (
$saParams as $Param)
    {
       
//if we find no more ?'s we're done then
       
if (($nPos = strpos($sQuery, '?', $nPos + 1)) === false)
        {
            break;
        }

       
//this test must be done second, because we need to increment offsets of $nPos for each ?.
        //we have no need to parse anything that isn't NULL.
       
if (!is_null($Param))
        {
            continue;
        }

               
       
//null value, replace this ? with NULL.
       
$sRetval = substr_replace($sRetval, 'NULL', $nPos, 1);
    }
           
           
    return
$sRetval;
}

?>

This will iterate the given list of parameters and replace any null values in the query with an actual null value. You'll want to use the resulting $sQuery to pass to mysqli_prepare(). For that, I use another routine that generates a list of the values (s, i, etc).

For example:

<?php

                    array_unshift
($saParams, $this->getPreparedTypeString($saParams));
                   
array_unshift($saParams, $stmt);
                   
                   
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param', $saParams);

?>

Where getPreparedTypeString is defined as:

<?php

       
public static function getPreparedTypeString(&$saParams)
        {
           
$sRetval = '';

           
//if not an array, or empty.. return empty string
           
if (!is_array($saParams) || !count($saParams))
            {
                return
$sRetval;
            }

           
//iterate the elements and figure out what they are, and append to result
           
foreach ($saParams as $Param)
            {
                if (
is_int($Param))
                {
                   
$sRetval .= 'i';
                }
                else if (
is_double($Param))
                {
                   
$sRetval .= 'd';
                }
                else if (
is_string($Param))
                {
                   
$sRetval .= 's';
                }
            }

            return
$sRetval;
        }

?>

To clarify why I pass array values by reference: They aren't being modified, so I don't want copies of them begin made in memory as they may be large. In other languages, this is much more efficient. Not sure if PHP handles passing values on a "copy on edit" basis.. but I'm guessing not.
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0
Darren
2 years ago
For those learning mysqli::prepare and mysqli_stmt::bind_params for the first time, here is a commented block of code which executes prepared queries and returns data in a similar format to the return values of mysqli_query.  I tried to minimize unnecessary classes, objects, or overhead for two reasons:
1) facilitate learning
2) allow relativity interchangeable use with mysqli_query

My goal is to lower the learning curve for whoever is starting out with these family of functions.  I am by no means an expert coder/scripter, so I am sure there are improvements and perhaps a few bugs, but I hope not =)

<?php
/*
Function: mysqli_prepared_query()
  Executes prepared querys given query syntax, and bind parameters
  Returns data in array format

Arguments:
  mysqli_link
  mysqli_prepare query
  mysqli_stmt_bind_param argmuent list in the form array($typeDefinitinonString, $var1 [, mixed $... ])

Return values:
  When given SELECT, SHOW, DESCRIBE or EXPLAIN statements: returns table data in the form resultArray[row number][associated field name]
  Returns number of rows affacted when given other queries
  Returns FALSE on error                       
*/
function mysqli_prepared_query($link,$sql,$bindParams = FALSE){
  if(
$stmt = mysqli_prepare($link,$sql)){
    if (
$bindParams){                                                                                                   
     
$bindParamsMethod = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_param');  //allows for call to mysqli_stmt->bind_param using variable argument list      
     
$bindParamsReferences = array();  //will act as arguments list for mysqli_stmt->bind_param 
     
     
$typeDefinitionString = array_shift($bindParams);
      foreach(
$bindParams as $key => $value){
       
$bindParamsReferences[$key] = &$bindParams[$key]; 
      }
     
     
array_unshift($bindParamsReferences,$typeDefinitionString); //returns typeDefinition as the first element of the string 
     
$bindParamsMethod->invokeArgs($stmt,$bindParamsReferences); //calls mysqli_stmt->bind_param suing $bindParamsRereferences as the argument list
   
}
    if(
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt)){
     
$resultMetaData = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($stmt);
      if(
$resultMetaData){                                                                              
       
$stmtRow = array(); //this will be a result row returned from mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)  
       
$rowReferences = array();  //this will reference $stmtRow and be passed to mysqli_bind_results
       
while ($field = mysqli_fetch_field($resultMetaData)) {
         
$rowReferences[] = &$stmtRow[$field->name];
        }                               
       
mysqli_free_result($resultMetaData);
       
$bindResultMethod = new ReflectionMethod('mysqli_stmt', 'bind_result');
       
$bindResultMethod->invokeArgs($stmt, $rowReferences); //calls mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,[$rowReferences]) using object-oriented style
       
$result = array();
        while(
mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)){
          foreach(
$stmtRow as $key => $value){  //variables must be assigned by value, so $result[] = $stmtRow does not work (not really sure why, something with referencing in $stmtRow)
           
$row[$key] = $value;          
          }
         
$result[] = $row;
        }
       
mysqli_stmt_free_result($stmt);
      } else {
       
$result = mysqli_stmt_affected_rows($stmt);
      }
     
mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);
    } else {
     
$result = FALSE;
    }
  } else {
   
$result = FALSE;
  }
  return
$result;
}

?>

Here's hoping the PHP gods don't smite me.
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samishiikihaku23 at gmail dot com
2 years ago
NOTES to new users! Or programmers like myself who learn the hard way!!!
Pay attention to the variables that are given in the function up above. ( string $types , mixed &$var1 [, mixed &$... ] ) . The example shows this too, but I personally didn't get it 'til trying to debug my code.

ITS REQUIRED TO PASS VARIABLES HERE. You can not pass straight data through here.

$stmt->bind('s','Something here'); Will error!!!

Just a clarification as to avoid another night like mine last night and this morning.
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alex dot deleyn at gmail dot com
3 years ago
MySQL has a "NULL-safe equal" operator (I'm guessing since 5.0)
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/comparison-operators.html#operator_equal-to

If you use this operator instead of the usual = you can interchange values and null in where clauses.

There is however a known bug when using this operator with datetime or timestamp fields: http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=36100
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erik at gravyllc dot com
4 years ago
WOW! Thanks for the code that fixed the issue with mysqli_stmt_bind_param and PHP 5.3+. Worth sharing again for people getting the error message that a reference was expected and a value was provided. Here's a snippet and the whole function that fixed it!

//Use it like this
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param', array_merge (array($sql_stmt, $type), $this->refValues($param)));

function refValues($arr)
{
    if (strnatcmp(phpversion(),'5.3') >= 0) //Reference is required for PHP 5.3+
    {
        $refs = array();
        foreach($arr as $key => $value)
            $refs[$key] = &$arr[$key];
         return $refs;
     }
     return $arr;
}
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Mark Reddin
4 years ago
Miguel Hatrick's Statement_Parameter class, as posted in these notes, allows for a relatively painless way of writing secure dynamic SQL.  It is secure against SQL injection because we still use bind parameters for any content coming from the user.

For example, the following code constructs an insert statement, but looks at which query string (GET) parameters are present in order to figure out which columns should be included.  The ParameterManager.php file is simply Miguel's classes as posted in this discussion.

<?php
require_once("dbConnectionParams.php");
require_once(
"ParameterManager.php");

$sp = new Statement_Parameter();

$column_list = "";

$value_list = "";

if (isset (
$_GET['name']) ) {
   
$column_list = $column_list . "name,";
   
$value_list = $value_list . "?,";
   
$sp->Add_Parameter('name', Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_STRING);
   
$sp->Set_Parameter('name',$_GET['name']);
}

if (isset(
$_GET['address']) ) {
   
$column_list = $column_list . "address,";
   
$value_list = $value_list . "?,";
   
$sp->Add_Parameter('address', Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_STRING);
   
$sp->Set_Parameter('address',$_GET['address']);
}

//tidy up column list and value list - the code above will always leave them ending in a comma, which we remove now
$column_list = substr($column_list, 0, strlen($column_list) -1);
$value_list = substr($value_list, 0, strlen($value_list) -1);

$sql = "insert into test_table (" . $column_list . ") values (" . $value_list . ");";

echo
$sql;

$mysqli = @new mysqli($host,$user,$password,$database);
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare($sql);

$sp->Bind_Params($stmt);

if(
$stmt->execute() === TRUE)
{
   
/*** assign the last insert id ***/
   
$last_id = $mysqli->insert_id;
    echo
"OK$last_id";
}
else {   
    echo
$mysqli->error;               
}

?>
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gregg at mochabomb dot com
4 years ago
Used the hints above - esp the call_user_func_array - what works simply is passing by reference...

<?php

class MySQL {

  
// so vars that are global to the class
  
var $connection;
   var
$dbc;

   function
__construct () {
     
$this->connection = new mysqli(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_NAME);
      if (
mysqli_connect_errno()) {
        
//printf("Could not connect to the DB: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error()); // TMI
        
printf("Could not connect to the DB");
         exit();
      }
   }

   function
DBi($info) {
     
//  a call has this array structure
      //  $this->info['params'] = array('is', &$user, &$name);
      //  $this->info['query'] = "select id, username, role_id from users where id = ? and name = ?";
      //  $this->info['close'] = "false";  // return $stmt for further work
      //
     
$mysqli = $this->connection;
     
$params = $info['params'];
     
// print_r($info);  // debug
     
if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare($info['query'])) {
         
$ret = call_user_func_array (array($stmt,'bind_param'),$info['params']); 
         
// $ret not used yet...
         
$stmt->execute();
          if (
$info['close'] == "true") {
            
$result = $mysqli->affected_rows;
            
$stmt->close();
             return
$result;
          } else {
             return
$stmt;
          }
      } else {
printf("Prepared Statement Error: $server_id \n"); }
   }

}

?> 

The close is generally for inserts, else the $stmt is returned for further processing...
 
<?php
// call the method to run the prepared query, then return statement handle.  If just wanted an insert, use close = true
if ( is_int($user) ) {
  
$this->info['params'] = array('is', &$user, &$name);
  
$this->info['query'] = "select id, username, role_id from users where id = ? and name = ?";
  
$this->info['close'] = "false"// return $stmt for further work
  
$stmt = parent::DBi($this->info);
  
$stmt->bind_result($col1, $col2, $col3);
   while(
$stmt->fetch() ) {
           
$res['id'] = $col1;
           
$res['username'] = $col2;
           
$res['role_id'] = $col3;
           
$res['error'] = 0;
   }
  
$stmt->close;
   return
$res;
}

?>
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0
eisoft
4 years ago
I did a prepared statement for inserting in a simple table - images ( blob ) and their unique identifiers ( string ). All my blobs have smaller sizes than the MAX-ALLOWED-PACKET value.

I've found that when binding my BLOB parameter, I need to pass it as a STRING, otherwise it's truncated to zero length in my table. So I have to do this:

<?php
   $ok
= $stmt->bind_param( 'ss', $id, $im ) ;
?>
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0
Miguel Hatrick
5 years ago
This might be helpful for someone. I made a class to manage the parameters

Its used like this:

<?php
$stmt
= $mysqli->prepare("CALL item_add(?, ?, ?, ?)");

$sp = new Statement_Parameter();

$sp->Add_Parameter('mydescription', Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_STRING);
$sp->Add_Parameter('myean',            Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_STRING);
$sp->Add_Parameter('myprice',        Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_DOUBLE);
$sp->Add_Parameter('myactive',        Statement_Parameter_Type::$STATEMENT_TYPE_INTEGER);

// call this to bind the parameters
$sp->Bind_Params($stmt);

//you can then modify the values as you wish
$sp->Set_Parameter('myactive',0);
$sp->Set_Parameter('mydescription','whatever');
   
/* execute prepared statement */
$stmt->execute();

class
Statement_Parameter
{
    private
$_array = array();
   
    public function
__constructor()
    {
    }
   
    public function
Add_Parameter($name, $type, $value = NULL)
    {
       
$this->_array[$name] = array("type" => $type, "value" => $value);   
    }
   
    public function
Get_Type_String()
    {
       
$types = "";   
   
        foreach(
$this->_array as $name => $la)
           
$types .= $la['type'];
       
        return
$types;
    }
   
    public function
Set_Parameter($name, $value)
    {
        if (isset(
$this->_array[$name]))
        {
           
$this->_array[$name]["value"] = $value;
            return
true;
        }
        return
false;
    }
   
    public function
Bind_Params(&$stmt)
    {
       
$ar = Array();
       
       
$ar[] = $this->Get_Type_String();
       
        foreach(
$this->_array as $name => $la)
           
$ar[] = &$this->_array[$name]['value'];
       
        return
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_param'),$ar);
    }
}

class
Statement_Parameter_Type
{
    public static
$STATEMENT_TYPE_INTEGER = 'i';
    public static
$STATEMENT_TYPE_DOUBLE =     'd';
    public static
$STATEMENT_TYPE_STRING =     's';
    public static
$STATEMENT_TYPE_BLOB =     'b';
}
?>
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0
Mahees
5 years ago
///////////////////////////////

Im sure many of you may want to use this functionality.

spent about 3hours writing this, so maybe i can save somone else some time, you can break it up into smaller functions for reuse as you wish.

the mysqli stmt bind param (mysqli_stmt_bind_param) function only takes one variable at a time, so its difficult to pass in a few variables to fill in the placeholder space.

this allows mysqli prepared statements with variable arguments, one sql template with multiple placeholders to be prepared and excuted.

hope this helps somone,
Mahees.

///////////////////////////////

<?php
$uname
= 'mahees';
$pass = 'mahees';

$userPassArr = DataAccess::fetch('SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ? AND password = ?', $uname, $pass);
print_r($userPassArr);

/*
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 1
            [username] => mahees
            [password] => mahees
        )

)
*/

$userPassArr = DataAccess::fetch('SELECT * FROM users');
print_r($userPassArr);

/*
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 1
            [username] => mahees
            [password] => mahees
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [id] => 4
            [username] => foo
            [password] => bar
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [id] => 5
            [username] => bar
            [password] => baz
        )

)
*/

//********* function in DataAccess class *********
//im sure this can be written better with more checks...but principle stands

   
static function fetch() {
       
$args = func_get_args();
       
$sql = array_shift($args);
       
$link = self::establish_db_conn();
        if (!
$stmt = mysqli_prepare($link, $sql)) {
           
self::close_db_conn();
            die(
'Please check your sql statement : unable to prepare');
        }
       
$types = str_repeat('s', count($args));
       
array_unshift($args, $types);
       
array_unshift($args, $stmt);
       
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param', $args);
       
       
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

       
$result = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($stmt);
       
$fields = array();
        while (
$field = mysqli_fetch_field($result)) {
           
$name = $field->name;
           
$fields[$name] = &$$name;
        }
       
array_unshift($fields, $stmt);
       
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_result', $fields);

       
array_shift($fields);
       
$results = array();
        while (
mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)) {
           
$temp = array();
            foreach(
$fields as $key => $val) { $temp[$key] = $val; }
           
array_push($results, $temp);
        }

       
mysqli_free_result($result);
       
mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);
       
self::close_db_conn();

        return
$results;
    }
?>
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0
mark at x2software dot net
6 years ago
I wanted to pass the parameters for several queries to a single function to fill them (insert / update having the same fields for example), while at the same time making the types array a bit easier to maintain when you've got a lot of parameters. Here's a simple solution I came up with:

<?php
function bindParameters(&$statement, &$params)
{
 
$args   = array();
 
$args[] = implode('', array_values($params));

  foreach (
$params as $paramName => $paramType)
  {
   
$args[] = &$params[$paramName];
   
$params[$paramName] = null;
  }

 
call_user_func_array(array(&$statement, 'bind_param'), $args);
}

// Usage:
$statement = $database->prepare('INSERT INTO test (value1, value2) VALUES (?, ?)');
$params    = array('param1' => 's',
                  
'param2' => 'i');

bindParameters($statement, $params);

$params['param1'] = 'parameter test';
$params['param2'] = 42;

$statement->execute();
?>

Note that the types will be overwritten after a call to bindParameters to provide a sensible default (otherwise it will be used as the parameter value when you execute the statement), so you need to reinitialize the types if you want to bind it to another statement.
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0
jette at nerdgirl dot dk
6 years ago
I already have a database class that makes everything nice and easy. But when it came to preparing, binding and executing, I found it was a real challenge to boil things down.

But luckily I stumbled over a bug-report with a workaround, that pointed me in the right direction.: http://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=43568

I now execute stored procedures (aka routines) like this:

<?php
$db
= new myDb();
$db->execProcedure('call someProc(?,?)','ss',array('param1','param2'));
?>

And this is the code to make it happen:
(I extracted this example from a bigger context, but you probably get the idea)

<?php
class myDb extends mysqli {

  public function 
__construct() {
   
//Connection established here
 
}

  public function
execProcedure($call,$types,$params) {
   
$stmt = $this->prepare($call);
   
$bind_names[] = $types;
    for (
$i=0; $i<count($params);$i++) {
     
$bind_name = 'bind' . $i;
      $
$bind_name = $params[$i];
     
$bind_names[] = &$$bind_name;
    }
   
$return = call_user_func_array(array($stmt,'bind_param'),$bind_names);
   
$stmt->execute();
   
$stmt->close();
  }
}
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0
michael dot martinek at gmail dot com
6 years ago
Small correction. This version removes the NULL element from the array, so it doesn't fall on to the next ? when passed to mysql_stmt_bind_param(). Note that $saParams is still passed by reference, but now it is being modified.

<?php

function preparse_prepared($sQuery, &$saParams)
{
   
$nPos = 0;

   
$sRetval = $sQuery;
    foreach (
$saParams as $x_Key => $Param)
    {
       
//if we find no more ?'s we're done then
       
if (($nPos = strpos($sQuery, '?', $nPos + 1)) === false)
        {
            break;
        }

       
//this test must be done second, because we need to increment offsets of $nPos for each ?.
        //we have no need to parse anything that isn't NULL.
       
if (!is_null($Param))
        {
            continue;
        }

               
       
//null value, replace this ? with NULL.
       
$sRetval = substr_replace($sRetval, 'NULL', $nPos, 1);

       
//unset this element now
       
unset($saParams[$x_Key]);
    }
           
           
    return
$sRetval;
}

?>
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0
Anonymous
7 years ago
It's worth noting that you have to bind all parameters in one fell swoop - you can't go through and call bind_param once for each.
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0
flame
7 years ago
Columns with type bigint need to be specified as type 'd' NOT 'i'.

Using 'i' results in large numbers (eg 3000169151) being truncated.

--
flame
up
-2
ghostarthour at exahost dot eu
3 years ago
Simple workaround for casting:

<?php
function mysqli_cast_workaround() {
   
$numargs = func_num_args();
   
$types = '';
    for (
$i = 0; $i < $numargs; $i++) {
        
$arg = func_get_arg($i);
         if (
is_numeric($arg)) {
            
$types.="i";
         }else{
            
$types.="s";
         }
        
$args[($i+1)] = $arg;
         unset(
$arg);        
    }  
   
$args[0] = $types;
   return
call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param',$args);  
}

?>
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