oci_field_scale

(PHP 5, PHP 7, PECL OCI8 >= 1.1.0)

oci_field_scale返回字段范围

说明

int oci_field_scale ( resource $statement , int $field )

返回索引为 field(从 1 开始)的字段的范围。如果无此字段则返回 FALSE

对于 FLOAT 字段,精度为非零值且范围为 -127。如果精度为 0,则字段为 NUMBER。其它类型为 NUMBER(precision, scale)。

Note:

在 PHP 5.0.0 之前的版本必须使用 ocicolumnscale() 替代本函数。该函数名仍然可用,为向下兼容作为 oci_field_scale() 的别名。不过其已被废弃,不推荐使用。

参见 oci_field_precision()oci_field_type()

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VLroyrenn
1 month ago
If you're converting SQL values to their respective float and int values based on scale and precision like I am, there's a catch, here.

This is a slimmed-down version of the conversion logic I'm using :

<?php
$col
= [
   
'id' => $field_id,
   
'name' => oci_field_name($statement, $field_id),
   
'type' => oci_field_type($statement, $field_id),
   
'scale' => oci_field_scale($statement, $field_id);
   
'precision' => oci_field_precision($statement, $field_id);
]

$str_data = oci_result($statement, $field_id)

switch(
$col['type']) {
    case
'NUMBER':
        if (
$col['precision'] !== 0 && $col['scale'] === -127) {
           
// A binary float
           
$data = floatval($str_data);
        } else if(
$col['scale'] === 0) {
           
// An integer
           
$data = intval($str_data);
        } else {
           
// A fixed-point decimal number, which has no equivalent in PHP, so float
           
$data = floatval($str_data);
        }
       
        break;
   
    default:
       
$data = $str_data;
        break;
}

echo(
"{$col['name']} : $str_data ({$col['type']} ({$col['precision']}, {$col['scale']})) -> $data\n");
?>

What the doc doesn't say is that any number column that was defined without a scale parameter counts as a plain NUMBER(), which always has a precision of 0 and a scale of -127, so they get interpreted as floats even when they should be integers.

What the doc also doesn't say is that __all analytics functions that return numbers return a plain NUMBER()__, so something like COUNT(*), RANK() or FIRST_VALUE(foo) is still going to net you a float.

Be careful with these if you have any type-sensitive code that relies on those values (I'm personally very fond of using type-hinting and strict_types = 1).
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