PHP 5.6.38 Released

Inkrement- bzw. Dekrementoperatoren

PHP unterstützt Prä- und Post-Inkrement- und Dekrementoperatoren im Stil der Programmiersprache C.

Hinweis: Die Inkrement-/Dekrement-Operatoren wirken nur auf Zahlen und Zeichenketten. Bei Arrays, Objekten und Ressourcen wirken sie nicht. Das Dekrementieren von NULL Werten hat ebenfalls keine Wirkung, aber sie zu Inkrementieren ergibt 1.

Inkrement- und Dekrementoperatoren
Beispiel Name Auswirkung
++$a Prä-Inkrement Erhöht $a um eins, und gibt dann $a zurück.
$a++ Post-Inkrement Gibt $a zurück, und erhöht dann $a um eins.
--$a Prä-Dekrement Vermindert $a um eins, und gibt dann $a zurück.
$a-- Post-Dekrement Gibt $a zurück, und erniedrigt dann $a um eins.

Ein einfaches Beispiel-Skript:

<?php
echo "<h3>Post-Inkrement</h3>";
$a 5;
echo 
"Sollte 5 sein: " $a++ . "<br />\n";
echo 
"Sollte 6 sein: " $a "<br />\n";

echo 
"<h3>Pre-Inkrement</h3>";
$a 5;
echo 
"Sollte 6 sein: " . ++$a "<br />\n";
echo 
"Sollte 6 sein: " $a "<br />\n";

echo 
"<h3>Post-Dekrement</h3>";
$a 5;
echo 
"Sollte 5 sein: " $a-- . "<br />\n";
echo 
"Sollte 4 sein: " $a "<br />\n";

echo 
"<h3>Pre-Dekrement</h3>";
$a 5;
echo 
"Sollte 4 sein: " . --$a "<br />\n";
echo 
"Sollte 4 sein: " $a "<br />\n";
?>

PHP folgt bei der Behandlung arithmetischer Operationen auf Zeichenvariablen der Perl-Konvention und nicht der von C. Zum Beispiel ändert in PHP und Perl $a = 'Z'; $a++; $a zu 'AA', während a = 'Z'; a++; in C a zu '[' ändert. (Der ASCII-Wert von 'Z' ist 90, der ASCII-Wert von '[' ist 91). Es ist zu beachten, dass Zeichenvariablen inkrementiert, aber nicht dekrementiert werden können, und dass nur einfache ASCII-Buchstaben und Ziffern (a-z, A-Z, 0-9) unterstützt werden. Das Inkrementieren oder Dekrementieren anderer Zeichenvariablen hat keine Auswirkung; die ursprüngliche Zeichenkette wird nicht verändert.

Beispiel #1 Arithmetrische Operationen an Zeichenvariablen

<?php
echo '== Buchstaben ==' PHP_EOL;
$s 'W';
for (
$n=0$n<6$n++) {
    echo ++
$s PHP_EOL;
}
// Ziffernzeichen verhalten sich anders
echo '== Ziffern ==' PHP_EOL;
$d 'A8';
for (
$n=0$n<6$n++) {
    echo ++
$d PHP_EOL;
}
$d 'A08';
for (
$n=0$n<6$n++) {
    echo ++
$d PHP_EOL;
}
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

== Buchstaben ==
X
Y
Z
AA
AB
AC
== Ziffern ==
A9
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
A09
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14

Das Inkrementieren oder Dekrementieren Boolescher Variablen hat keine Auswirkung.

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User Contributed Notes 12 notes

up
49
hartmut at php dot net
6 years ago
Note that

$a="9D9"; var_dump(++$a);   => string(3) "9E0"

but counting onwards from there

$a="9E0"; var_dump(++$a);   => float(10)

this is due to "9E0" being interpreted as a string representation of the float constant 9E0 (or 9e0), and thus evalutes to 9 * 10^0 = 9 (in a float context)
up
6
ayyappan dot ashok at gmail dot com
2 years ago
Rule for Increment and decrement:

At some moment we could be confused with increment and decrement in various cases. To avoid such cases, let us follow certain logical rule behind to get successful results with out mess.

<?php
           $n
= 3;
           echo
$n-- + --$n;
           echo
"<br/>";
           echo
$n;
?>

1. Postfix form of ++,-- operator follows the rule  [ use-then-change ],

2. Prefix form (++x,--x) follows the rule [ change-then-use ].

Solution based on the rule:

Step 1: 
use then change   $n--  use is 3 and change is 2

Step 2. 
change then use   --$n  change is 2 and use is 1

Step 3.
use + use = (3 + 1) = 4

Courtesy : stackoverflow : Sunil Dhillon : 4686665
up
7
dsbeam at gmail dot com
9 years ago
When using the ++ operator by itself on a variable, ++$var is faster than $var++ and uses slightly less memory (in my experiments).  It would seem like this could be optimized in the language during runtime (if $var++ is the only thing in the whole statement, it could be treated as ++$var).

I conducted many tests (I believe to be fair), and here's one of the results:

$i++ took 8.47515535355 seconds and 2360 bytes
++$i took 7.80081486702 seconds and 2160 bytes

Here's my code.  If anyone sees a bias in it, tell me.  I conducted it many times, each time going through a loop one million iterations and doing each test 10 - 15 times (10 - 15 million uses of the ++ operator).

<?php

ini_set
( 'MAX_EXEC_TIME', 120 );
ob_start( );

$num_tests = 10;
$startFirst = $startSecond = $endFirst = $endSecond = $startFirstMemory = $endFirstMemory = $startSecondMemory = $endSecondMemory = $someVal = 0;
$times = array( '$i++' => array( 'time' => 0, 'memory' => 0 ), '++$i' => array( 'total' => 0, 'memory' => 0 ) );

for(
$j = 0; $j < $num_tests; ++$j )
{
        for(
$i = 0, $startFirstMemory = memory_get_usage( ), $startFirst = microtime( true ); $i < 10000000; $i++ ){ $someval = 2; }
       
$endFirstMemory = memory_get_usage( );
       
$endFirst = microtime( true );

        for(
$i = 0, $startSecondMemory = memory_get_usage( ), $startSecond = microtime( true ); $i < 10000000; ++$i ){ $someval = 2; }
       
$endSecondMemory = memory_get_usage( );
       
$endSecond = microtime( true );

       
$times[ '$i++' ][ $j ] = array( 'startTime' => $startFirst, 'endTime' => $endFirst, 'startMemory' => $startFirstMemory, 'endMemory' => $endFirstMemory );
       
$times[ '++$i' ][ $j ] = array( 'startTime' => $startSecond, 'endTime' => $endSecond, 'startMemory' => $startSecondMemory, 'endMemory' => $endSecondMemory );
}

for(
$i = 0; $i < $num_tests; ++$i )
{
       
$times[ '$i++' ][ 'time' ] += ( $times[ '$i++' ][ $i ][ 'endTime' ] - $times[ '$i++' ][ $i ][ 'startTime' ] );
       
$times[ '++$i' ][ 'time' ] += ( $times[ '++$i' ][ $i ][ 'endTime' ] - $times[ '++$i' ][ $i ][ 'startTime' ] );
       
$times[ '$i++' ][ 'memory' ] += ( $times[ '$i++' ][ $i ][ 'endMemory' ] - $times[ '$i++' ][ $i ][ 'startMemory' ] );
       
$times[ '++$i' ][ 'memory' ] += ( $times[ '++$i' ][ $i ][ 'endMemory' ] - $times[ '++$i' ][ $i ][ 'startMemory' ] );
}

echo
'There were ' . $num_tests . ' tests conducted, here\'s the totals<br /><br />
$i++ took '
. $times[ '$i++' ][ 'time' ] . ' seconds and ' . $times[ '$i++' ][ 'memory' ] . ' bytes<br />
++$i took '
. $times[ '++$i' ][ 'time' ] . ' seconds and ' . $times[ '++$i' ][ 'memory' ] . ' bytes';

ob_end_flush( );

?>

Try it yourself, ;)
up
-1
Brad Proctor
7 years ago
I ran some tests (on PHP 5.3.3) of my own and was surprised to find $i += 1 to be the fastest method of incrementing.  Here are the methods fastest to slowest:

$i += 1;
++$i;
$i++;
$i = $i + 1;
up
-1
aluciffer at hotmail dot com
3 years ago
Regarding character incrementing and PHP following Perl's convention with character operations.
Actually i found that there is a difference, and incrementing and decrementing unfortunately does not yield the reverse, expected results.
For example, the following piece of code:
<?php
echo '== Alphabets ==' . PHP_EOL;
$s = 'W';
for (
$n=0; $n<10; $n++) {
    echo ++
$s . ' ';
}
echo
PHP_EOL;

for (
$n=10; $n>0; $n--) {
    echo (--
$s) . ' ';
}
?>
Will output:
== Alphabets ==
X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF AG
AG AG AG AG AG AG AG AG AG AG

Please note that the decrement operator has no effect on the character or string.

On the other hand, in Perl, the similar script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my $s = 'W';

foreach (1 .. 10) {
print  ++$s . " ";


print "\n";

foreach (1 .. 10) {
print --$s . " ";
}

Will output:

X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF AG
-1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9 -10
up
0
cleong at letstalk dot com
16 years ago
Note that the ++ and -- don't convert a boolean to an int. The following code will loop forever.

function a($start_index) {
for($i = $start_index; $i < 10; $i++) echo "\$i = $i\n";
}

a(false);

This behavior is, of course, very different from that in C. Had me pulling out my hair for a while.
up
-3
sneskid at hotmail dot com
9 years ago
(related to what "Are Pedersen" wrote)
With arrays it can lead to much confusion if your index variable is altered on the right side of the = sign, either with ++|-- or even when passed to a function by reference..
Consider these (PHP 5):
<?php
$A
[$a] = ++$a; // [1]=1
$B[++$b] = ++$b; // [1]=2
$C[$c+=0] = ++$c; // [0]=1
?>
In 'A' you have to be aware that PHP evaluates $A[$a] last.
Yet in 'B' and 'C' PHP evaluates the index and saves it in a temporary variable.

You can always force PHP to evaluate a variable without explicitly storing it as a named variable first, with a simple "+=0" like in example 'C'.

Compared to 'A', 'C' gives the more logically expected result, when we expect evaluation occurs left to right.
PHP does evaluate left to right BUT it will attempt to cut down on temporary variables, which can lead to confusing results.

So just be aware and use either behavior to your advantage for the desired functionality.
up
-3
fred at surleau dot com
17 years ago
Other samples :
$l="A";      $l++; -> $l="B"
$l="A0";     $l++; -> $l="A1"
$l="A9";     $l++; -> $l="B0"
$l="Z99";    $l++; -> $l="AA00"
$l="5Z9";    $l++; -> $l="6A0"
$l="9Z9";    $l++; -> $l="10A0"
$l="9z9";    $l++; -> $l="10a0"
$l="J85410"; $l++; -> $l="J85411"
$l="J99999"; $l++; -> $l="K00000"
$l="K00000"; $l++; -> $l="K00001"
up
-7
michiel ed thalent circle nl
6 years ago
BEWARE:

If incrementing an uninitialized variable you will not get an E_NOTICE error. This may caused you to not find issue's like the visibility of a property.

<?php
class a {
    private
$foo = 1;
}

class
b extends a {
    public function
inc() {
        echo ++
$this->foo;
    }
}

$b = new b;
$b->inc();
?>

Will output 1 and not 2 (if $foo was accessible).
Also no notices are given.
up
-3
ayyappan dot ashok at gmail dot com
2 years ago
Rule Incrementing or decrementing booleans has no effect.

It has an effort on Incrementing or decrementing booleans.

Please look over the code.

$var = true;
echo ++$var;   //Results 1

Similarly

$var = true;
echo ++$var;   //Results 1

$var = (int)false;
echo ++$var;   //Results 1

$var = (int)false;
echo $var++;   //Results 0;   

Note : Tested on PHP Version 5.5.32
up
-3
vlad_stuk at mail dot ru
5 months ago
Самое простое описание работы инкремента, которое я встречал и будет удобно для понимания новичку:

Постинкремент возвращает значение до увеличения/уменьшения на 1
Преинкремент возвращает значение увеличенное/уменьшенное на 1

$b = 6;
$a = $b++; // $a = 6, $b = 7

$b = 6;
$a = $b--; // $a=6, $b = 5

$b = 6;
$a = ++$b; // $a = 7, $b = 7

$b = 6;
$a = --$b; // $a = 5, $b = 5
up
-29
johnnythan at nospam dot gmx dot com
6 years ago
If you have a trailing zero and use the increment, the trailing zero will not remain. Was at least unexpected for me at first, although it's logical if you think about it.

<?php
$start
= '01';
$start++;
print
$start; //Outputs '2' not '02'
?>
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