PHP 7.2.0 Beta 1 Released

Backward incompatible changes

Changes to error and exception handling

Many fatal and recoverable fatal errors have been converted to exceptions in PHP 7. These error exceptions inherit from the Error class, which itself implements the Throwable interface (the new base interface all exceptions inherit).

This means that custom error handlers may no longer be triggered because exceptions may be thrown instead (causing new fatal errors for uncaught Error exceptions).

A fuller description of how errors operate in PHP 7 can be found on the PHP 7 errors page. This migration guide will merely enumerate the changes that affect backward compatibility.

set_exception_handler() is no longer guaranteed to receive Exception objects

Code that implements an exception handler registered with set_exception_handler() using a type declaration of Exception will cause a fatal error when an Error object is thrown.

If the handler needs to work on both PHP 5 and 7, you should remove the type declaration from the handler, while code that is being migrated to work on PHP 7 exclusively can simply replace the Exception type declaration with Throwable instead.

<?php
// PHP 5 era code that will break.
function handler(Exception $e) { ... }
set_exception_handler('handler');

// PHP 5 and 7 compatible.
function handler($e) { ... }

// PHP 7 only.
function handler(Throwable $e) { ... }
?>

Internal constructors always throw exceptions on failure

Previously, some internal classes would return NULL or an unusable object when the constructor failed. All internal classes will now throw an Exception in this case in the same way that user classes already had to.

Parse errors throw ParseError

Parser errors now throw a ParseError object. Error handling for eval() should now include a catch block that can handle this error.

E_STRICT notices severity changes

All of the E_STRICT notices have been reclassified to other levels. E_STRICT constant is retained, so calls like error_reporting(E_ALL|E_STRICT) will not cause an error.

E_STRICT notices severity changes
Situation New level/behaviour
Indexing by a resource E_NOTICE
Abstract static methods Notice removed, triggers no error
"Redefining" a constructor Notice removed, triggers no error
Signature mismatch during inheritance E_WARNING
Same (compatible) property in two used traits Notice removed, triggers no error
Accessing static property non-statically E_NOTICE
Only variables should be assigned by reference E_NOTICE
Only variables should be passed by reference E_NOTICE
Calling non-static methods statically E_DEPRECATED

Changes to variable handling

PHP 7 now uses an abstract syntax tree when parsing source files. This has permitted many improvements to the language which were previously impossible due to limitations in the parser used in earlier versions of PHP, but has resulted in the removal of a few special cases for consistency reasons, which has resulted in backward compatibility breaks. These cases are detailed in this section.

Changes to the handling of indirect variables, properties, and methods

Indirect access to variables, properties, and methods will now be evaluated strictly in left-to-right order, as opposed to the previous mix of special cases. The table below shows how the order of evaluation has changed.

Old and new evaluation of indirect expressions
Expression PHP 5 interpretation PHP 7 interpretation
$$foo['bar']['baz'] ${$foo['bar']['baz']} ($$foo)['bar']['baz']
$foo->$bar['baz'] $foo->{$bar['baz']} ($foo->$bar)['baz']
$foo->$bar['baz']() $foo->{$bar['baz']}() ($foo->$bar)['baz']()
Foo::$bar['baz']() Foo::{$bar['baz']}() (Foo::$bar)['baz']()

Code that used the old right-to-left evaluation order must be rewritten to explicitly use that evaluation order with curly braces (see the above middle column). This will make the code both forwards compatible with PHP 7.x and backwards compatible with PHP 5.x.

Changes to list() handling

list() no longer assigns variables in reverse order

list() will now assign values to variables in the order they are defined, rather than reverse order. In general, this only affects the case where list() is being used in conjunction with the array [] operator, as shown below:

<?php
list($a[], $a[], $a[]) = [123];
var_dump($a);
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(3)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(1)
}

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(3)
}

In general, it is recommended not to rely on the order in which list() assignments occur, as this is an implementation detail that may change again in the future.

Empty list() assignments have been removed

list() constructs can no longer be empty. The following are no longer allowed:

<?php
list() = $a;
list(,,) = 
$a;
list(
$x, list(), $y) = $a;
?>
list() cannot unpack strings

list() can no longer unpack string variables. str_split() should be used instead.

Array ordering when elements are automatically created during by reference assignments has changed

The order of the elements in an array has changed when those elements have been automatically created by referencing them in a by reference assignment. For example:

<?php
$array 
= [];
$array["a"] =& $array["b"];
$array["b"] = 1;
var_dump($array);
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

array(2) {
  ["b"]=>
  &int(1)
  ["a"]=>
  &int(1)
}

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

array(2) {
  ["a"]=>
  &int(1)
  ["b"]=>
  &int(1)
}

global only accepts simple variables

Variable variables can no longer be used with the global keyword. The curly brace syntax can be used to emulate the previous behaviour if required:

<?php
function f() {
    
// Valid in PHP 5 only.
    
global $$foo->bar;

    
// Valid in PHP 5 and 7.
    
global ${$foo->bar};
}
?>

As a general principle, using anything other than a bare variable with global is discouraged.

Parentheses around function arguments no longer affect behaviour

In PHP 5, using redundant parentheses around a function argument could quiet strict standards warnings when the function argument was passed by reference. The warning will now always be issued.

<?php
function getArray() {
    return [
123];
}

function 
squareArray(array &$a) {
    foreach (
$a as &$v) {
        
$v **= 2;
    }
}

// Generates a warning in PHP 7.
squareArray((getArray()));
?>

L'exemple ci-dessus va afficher :

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /tmp/test.php on line 13

Changements concernant foreach

Des changements mineurs ont été faits sur le comportement de la structure de contrôle foreach, principalement sur la gestion du pointeur interne de tableau et la modification du tableau étant parcouru.

foreach ne modifie plus le pointeur interne de tableau

Avant PHP 7, le pointeur interne de tableau était modifié pendant que l'on parcourait un tableau avec foreach. Cela n'est plus le cas, comme le montre l'exemple suivant :

<?php
$array 
= [012];
foreach (
$array as &$val) {
    
var_dump(current($array));
}
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

int(1)
int(2)
bool(false)

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

int(0)
int(0)
int(0)

foreach par valeur travaille sur une copie du tableau

Lors de l'utilisation du mode par défaut (par valeur), foreach travaille maintenant sur une copie du tableau en cours parcouru plutôt que sur le tableau lui-même. Cela signifie que les changements réalisés sur le tableau pendant son parcours n'affecteront pas les valeurs qui sont parcourues.

Le comportement du parcours de foreach par référence a été amélioré

Lors du parcours d'un tableau par référence, foreach identifie mieux les changements faits au tableau pendant son parcours. Par exemple, si des valeurs sont ajoutées à un tableau pendant son parcours, alors ces nouvelles valeurs seront également parcourues :

<?php
$array 
= [0];
foreach (
$array as &$val) {
    
var_dump($val);
    
$array[1] = 1;
}
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

int(0)

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

int(0)
int(1)

Parcours d'objets non-Traversable

Le parcours d'un objet non-Traversable est maintenant identique au parcours d'un tableau par référence. En conséquence l'amélioration du comportement lors de la modification d'un tableau pendant son parcours est également appliquée lorsque des propriétés sont ajoutées ou supprimées d'un objet.

Changes to integer handling

Invalid octal literals

Previously, octal literals that contained invalid numbers were silently truncated (0128 was taken as 012). Now, an invalid octal literal will cause a parse error.

Negative bitshifts

Bitwise shifts by negative numbers will now throw an ArithmeticError:

<?php
var_dump
(>> -1);
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

int(0)

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

Fatal error: Uncaught ArithmeticError: Bit shift by negative number in /tmp/test.php:2
Stack trace:
#0 {main}
  thrown in /tmp/test.php on line 2

Out of range bitshifts

Bitwise shifts (in either direction) beyond the bit width of an integer will always result in 0. Previously, the behaviour of such shifts was architecture dependent.

Changes to Division By Zero

Previously, when 0 was used as the divisor for either the divide (/) or modulus (%) operators, an E_WARNING would be emitted and false would be returned. Now, the divide operator returns a float as either +INF, -INF, or NAN, as specified by IEEE 754. The modulus operator E_WARNING has been removed and will throw a DivisionByZeroError exception.

<?php
var_dump
(3/0);
var_dump(0/0);
var_dump(0%0);
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

Warning: Division by zero in %s on line %d
bool(false)

Warning: Division by zero in %s on line %d
bool(false)

Warning: Division by zero in %s on line %d
bool(false)

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

Warning: Division by zero in %s on line %d
float(INF)

Warning: Division by zero in %s on line %d
float(NAN)

PHP Fatal error:  Uncaught DivisionByZeroError: Modulo by zero in %s line %d

Changes to string handling

Hexadecimal strings are no longer considered numeric

Strings containing hexadecimal numbers are no longer considered to be numeric. For example:

<?php
var_dump
("0x123" == "291");
var_dump(is_numeric("0x123"));
var_dump("0xe" "0x1");
var_dump(substr("foo""0x1"));
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

bool(true)
bool(true)
int(15)
string(2) "oo"

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

bool(false)
bool(false)
int(0)

Notice: A non well formed numeric value encountered in /tmp/test.php on line 5
string(3) "foo"

filter_var() can be used to check if a string contains a hexadecimal number, and also to convert a string of that type to an integer:

<?php
$str 
"0xffff";
$int filter_var($strFILTER_VALIDATE_INTFILTER_FLAG_ALLOW_HEX);
if (
false === $int) {
    throw new 
Exception("Invalid integer!");
}
var_dump($int); // int(65535)
?>

\u{ may cause errors

Due to the addition of the new Unicode codepoint escape syntax, strings containing a literal \u{ followed by an invalid sequence will cause a fatal error. To avoid this, the leading backslash should be escaped.

Fonctions supprimées

call_user_method() et call_user_method_array()

Ces fonctions sont obsolètes dans PHP 4.1.0, et remplacées par call_user_func() et call_user_func_array(). Vous pourriez également utiliser les fonctions variables et/ou l'opérateur ....

mcrypt aliases

La fonction obsolète mcrypt_generic_end() a été remplacée par mcrypt_generic_deinit().

De plus, les fonctions obsolètes mcrypt_ecb(), mcrypt_cbc(), mcrypt_cfb() et mcrypt_ofb() ont été remplacées par l'utilisation de mcrypt_decrypt() avec la constante appropriée MCRYPT_MODE_*.

intl aliases

Les alias obsolètes datefmt_set_timezone_id() et IntlDateFormatter::setTimeZoneID() ont été supprimés et remplacés respectivement par datefmt_set_timezone() et IntlDateFormatter::setTimeZone().

set_magic_quotes_runtime()

Les fonctions set_magic_quotes_runtime(), ainsi que son alias magic_quotes_runtime(), ont été supprimés. Ils étaient obsolètes depuis PHP 5.3.0, et sans effet depuis la suppression des guillemets magiques en PHP 5.4.0.

set_socket_blocking()

L'alias obsolète set_socket_blocking() a été supprimé et remplacé par stream_set_blocking().

dl() avec PHP-FPM

dl() ne peut plus être utilisé avec PHP-FPM. Il continue à fonctionner dans les SAPIs CLI et Embed.

Fonctions GD Type1

Le support des polices PostScript Type1 a été supprimé de l'extension GD, entraînant la suppression des fonctions suivantes :

A la place, il est recommandé d'utiliser les polices TrueType et leurs fonctions associées.

Removed INI directives

Removed features

The following INI directives have been removed as their associated features have also been removed:

xsl.security_prefs

The xsl.security_prefs directive has been removed. Instead, the XsltProcessor::setSecurityPrefs() method should be called to control the security preferences on a per-processor basis.

Other backward incompatible changes

New objects cannot be assigned by reference

The result of the new statement can no longer be assigned to a variable by reference:

<?php
class {}
$c =& new C;
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /tmp/test.php on line 3

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected 'new' (T_NEW) in /tmp/test.php on line 3

Invalid class, interface and trait names

The following names cannot be used to name classes, interfaces or traits:

Furthermore, the following names should not be used. Although they will not generate an error in PHP 7.0, they are reserved for future use and should be considered deprecated.

ASP and script PHP tags removed

Support for using ASP and script tags to delimit PHP code has been removed. The affected tags are:

Removed ASP and script tags
Opening tag Closing tag
<% %>
<%= %>
<script language="php"> </script>

Calls from incompatible context removed

Previously deprecated in PHP 5.6, static calls made to a non-static method with an incompatible context will now result in the called method having an undefined $this variable and a deprecation warning being issued.

<?php
class {
    public function 
test() { var_dump($this); }
}

// Note: Does NOT extend A
class {
    public function 
callNonStaticMethodOfA() { A::test(); }
}

(new 
B)->callNonStaticMethodOfA();
?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5.6 :

Deprecated: Non-static method A::test() should not be called statically, assuming $this from incompatible context in /tmp/test.php on line 8
object(B)#1 (0) {
}

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

Deprecated: Non-static method A::test() should not be called statically in /tmp/test.php on line 8

Notice: Undefined variable: this in /tmp/test.php on line 3
NULL

yield is now a right associative operator

The yield construct no longer requires parentheses, and has been changed to a right associative operator with precedence between print and =>. This can result in changed behaviour:

<?php
echo yield -1;
// Was previously interpreted as
echo (yield) - 1;
// And is now interpreted as
echo yield (-1);

yield $foo or die;
// Was previously interpreted as
yield ($foo or die);
// And is now interpreted as
(yield $foo) or die;
?>

Parentheses can be used to disambiguate those cases.

Functions cannot have multiple parameters with the same name

It is no longer possible to define two or more function parameters with the same name. For example, the following function will trigger an E_COMPILE_ERROR:

<?php
function foo($a$b$unused$unused) {
    
//
}
?>

Functions inspecting arguments report the current parameter value

func_get_arg(), func_get_args(), debug_backtrace() and exception backtraces will no longer report the original value that was passed to a parameter, but will instead provide the current value (which might have been modified).

<?php
function foo($x) {
    
$x++;
    
var_dump(func_get_arg(0));
}
foo(1);?>

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 5 :

1

Résultat de l'exemple ci-dessus en PHP 7 :

2

Switch statements cannot have multiple default blocks

It is no longer possible to define two or more default blocks in a switch statement. For example, the following switch statement will trigger an E_COMPILE_ERROR:

<?php
switch (1) {
    default:
    break;
    default:
    break;
}
?>

$HTTP_RAW_POST_DATA removed

$HTTP_RAW_POST_DATA is no longer available. The php://input stream should be used instead.

# comments in INI files removed

Support for prefixing comments with # in INI files has been removed. ; (semi-colon) should be used instead. This change applies to php.ini, as well as files handled by parse_ini_file() and parse_ini_string().

JSON extension replaced with JSOND

The JSON extension has been replaced with JSOND, causing three minor BC breaks. Firstly, a number must not end in a decimal point (i.e. 34. must be changed to either 34.0 or 34). Secondly, when using scientific notation, the e exponent must not immediately follow a decimal point (i.e. 3.e3 must be changed to either 3.0e3 or 3e3). Finally, an empty string is no longer considered valid JSON.

Internal function failure on overflow

Previously, internal functions would silently truncate numbers produced from float-to-integer coercions when the float was too large to represent as an integer. Now, an E_WARNING will be emitted and NULL will be returned.

Fixes to custom session handler return values

Any predicate functions implemented by custom session handlers that return either FALSE or -1 will be fatal errors. If any value from these functions other than a boolean, -1, or 0 is returned, then it will fail and an E_WARNING will be emitted.

Sort order of equal elements

The internal sorting algorithm has been improved, what may result in different sort order of elements, which compare as equal, than before.

Note:

Don't rely on the order of elements which compare as equal; it might change anytime.

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User Contributed Notes 8 notes

up
154
me at fquff dot io
1 year ago
[Editor's note: fixed limit on user request]

As a mathematician, 3/0 == +INF IS JUST WRONG. You can't just assume 3/0 == lim_{x->0+} 3/x, which is +INF indeed, because division IS NOT A CONTINUOUS FUNCTION in x == 0.

Also, 3/0 == +INF ("positive" infinity) while -3/0 == -INF ("negative" infinity) requires the assumption that 0 is a positive number, which is just as illogical as it looks like.

The fact that a warning is emitted is good, but it should definitely equals to NaN. ±INF is just illogical (and arithmetically wrong).

Except for this "detail", looks an amazing update, can't wait to test it even further!

Cheers,
P.
up
56
mossy2100
1 year ago
Although $x/0 is technically not infinity in a purely mathematical sense, when you understand why the IEEE float includes a value for infinity, and returns infinity in this case, it makes sense that PHP would agree with this.

The reason is that programmers don't usually divide by 0 on purpose. A value of 0 as a divisor usually occurs due to underflow, i.e. a value which is too small to be represented as a float. So, for example, if you have values like:
$x = 1;
$y = 1e-15 * 1e-15;
$z = $x/$y;
Because $y will have underflowed to 0, the division operation will throw the division by zero warning, and $z will be set to INF. In a better computer, however, $y would not have the value 0 (it would be 1e-30) and $z would not have the value INF (it would be 1e30).

In other words, 0 is not only representative of an actual 0, but also a very small number which float cannot represent correctly (underflow), and INF does not only represent infinity, but also a very big number which float cannot represent correctly (overflow). We do the best we can within the limitations of floating point values, which are really just good approximations of the actual numbers being represented.

What does bother me is that division by zero is handled in two different ways depending on the operator. I would have preferred the new DivisionByZeroError exception to be thrown in all cases, for consistency and to enforce good programming practices.
up
72
tuxedobob
1 year ago
As a programmer, I don't care whether 3/0 is INF or NaN. Both answers are (probably) equally useless, and tell me that something somewhere else is screwed up.
up
3
maba at mb-systemhaus dot net
1 year ago
NOTE:
the new variable handling in PHP 7 also has side effects on the COM .NET extension. Numeric variants (in the Windows application space) now must be quoted when passed over from PHP. This is the case when the receiving application expects a variable of type variant.

Here is an example:

<?php
  $word
= new COM('Word.Application');

 
// now load a document, ...

  // the following works in PHP 5 but will throw an exception in PHP 7
 
$word->ActiveDocument->PrintOut(false, false, 0, $outfile);

 
// the following works in PHP 7 as well, please note the quotes around the '0'
 
$word->ActiveDocument->PrintOut(false, false, '0', $outfile);
?>
up
2
viktor dot csiky at nospam dot nospam dot eu
1 year ago
It is stated:

"foreach by-value operates on a copy of the array

When used in the default by-value mode, foreach will now operate on a copy of the array being iterated rather than the array itself. This means that changes to the array made during iteration will not affect the values that are iterated."

Please note that this is not exactly true. New foreach operates on a copy of the array, by-value or by-reference. It seems that in the latter case, the array copy is simply moved over (to) the original array before it is presumably destroyed.

As a consequence of this, you may not "dereference" an array containing values - e.g. for use with ReflectionMethod::invokeArgs() or the good ole' call_user_func().
Consider the snippet below:

<?php
function deref(Array $inputArray)
{
       
$retVal = [];
       
        foreach (
$inputArray as &$inputValue)
        {
           
$retVal[] = $inputValue;
        }

        return
$retVal;
}
?>

As of PHP 7.0, this *will no longer work*. You will get the usual suspect:

PHP Warning:  Parameter n to whatever() expected to be a reference, value given in baz.php on line x

You need to convert it to explicitly reference the original array:
<?php
function deref(Array $inputArray)
{
       
$retVal = [];
       
        foreach (
$inputArray as $inputKey => $inputValue)
        {
           
$retVal[$inputKey] = &$inputArray[$inputKey];
        }

        return
$retVal;
}
?>

PLEASE NOTE that this might have the unforeseen consequence of your code not working anymore in php versions less than 5.3 (that is, 5.2 and below).
up
2
Frank
1 year ago
[Editor's Note: that change is listed in the "Changed functions" section.]

The substr function has also been changed in a backward incompatible way.

<?php
substr
("test",4);  # false in PHP 5,  "" in PHP 7
?>

In fact, this is the only thing we had to change in a number of places for our code base to run on PHP 7. It's definitely an improvement though, as the old behavior tended to cause bugs in border cases.
up
0
Ray.Paseur sometimes uses Gmail
4 months ago
In the section captioned "Changes to the handling of indirect variables, properties, and methods" there are parentheses used in the table directly beneath "PHP 7 interpretation." 

The parentheses are intended to show the evaluation order, but they are not part of the syntax, and should not be used in the variable definition or reference.  This juxtaposition confused one of my colleagues; hopefully this note will save someone else some time.

Examples of the correct curly-brace syntax is further down the page, in the section captioned "global only accepts simple variables."
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