SunshinePHP Developer Conference 2015

function_exists

(PHP 4, PHP 5)

function_exists如果给定的函数已经被定义就返回 TRUE

说明

bool function_exists ( string $function_name )

在已经定义的函数列表(包括系统自带的函数和用户自定义的函数)中查找 function_name

参数

function_name

函数名,必须为一个字符串。

返回值

如果 function_name 存在且的确是一个函数就返回 TRUE ,反之则返回 FALSE

Note:

对于语法结构的判断,例如 include_onceecho 将会返回 FALSE

范例

Example #1 function_exists() 的例子

<?php
if (function_exists('imap_open')) {
    echo 
"IMAP functions are available.<br />\n";
} else {
    echo 
"IMAP functions are not available.<br />\n";
}
?>

注释

Note:

当本配置或者编译或编译选项禁用某函数时,该函数名也可能存在( image 就是一个现成的例子)

参见

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User Contributed Notes 19 notes

up
13
kitchin
2 years ago
You can use this function to conditionally define functions, see: http://php.net/manual/en/functions.user-defined.php

For instance Wordpress uses it to make functions "pluggable." If a plugin has already defined a pluggable function, then the WP code knows not to try to redefine it.

But function_exists() will always return true unless you wrap any later function definition in a conditional clause, like if(){...}. This is a subtle matter in PHP parsing. Some examples:

<?php
if (function_exists('foo')) {
  print
"foo defined\\n";
} else {
  print
"foo not defined\\n";
}
function
foo() {}

if (
function_exists('bar')) {
  print
"bar defined\\n";
} else {
  print
"defining bar\\n";
  function
bar() {}
}
print
"calling bar\\n";
bar(); // ok to call function conditionally defined earlier

print "calling baz\\n";
baz(); // ok to call function unconditionally defined later
function baz() {}

qux(); // NOT ok to call function conditionally defined later
if (!function_exists('qux')) {
  function
qux() {}
}
?>
Prints:
  foo defined
  defining bar
  calling bar
  calling baz
  PHP Fatal error: Call to undefined function qux()

Any oddities are probably due to the order in which you include/require files.
up
2
neelam_ab2003 at yahoo dot co dot in
8 years ago
<?php
/*PHP doesn't Support nested functions. I have tried following in PHP_VERSION - 5.1.2*/

function A(){}

function
B(){
    function
C(){
        function
D(){}
    }
}

IsFunctionExist('A');
IsFunctionExist('B');
IsFunctionExist('C');
IsFunctionExist('D');

function
IsFunctionExist($funcName){
    echo
function_exists($funcName)?" $funcName exist <br>":" $funcName doesn't exist <br>";
}
?>

/*O U T P U T
A exist
B exist
C doesn't exist
D doesn't exist
*/
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2
webmaster at mamo-net dot de
7 years ago
If you use suhosin.executor.func.blacklist instead of disabled_functions in your php.ini, function_exists will return true for a disabled function. I used this to have the same beahviour with suhosin.executor.func.blacklist and disabled_functions:

<?php
function suhosin_function_exists($func) {
    if (
extension_loaded('suhosin')) {
       
$suhosin = @ini_get("suhosin.executor.func.blacklist");
        if (empty(
$suhosin) == false) {
           
$suhosin = explode(',', $suhosin);
           
$suhosin = array_map('trim', $suhosin);
           
$suhosin = array_map('strtolower', $suhosin);
            return (
function_exists($func) == true && array_search($func, $suhosin) === false);
        }
    }
    return
function_exists($func);
}
?>
up
0
php at fluidthoughts dot com
6 years ago
function_exists returns false on NULL and empty string:

<?php
       
if (function_exists('')) {
                echo
"empty string function exists\n";
        }

        if (
function_exists(NULL)) {
                echo
"NULL function exists\n";
        }
?>

Neither of the echo statements happen when I run this.
up
0
White-Gandalf
7 years ago
I stumbled over the same problem as "eddiec" (users not able or not willing to use "_once"-suffixes).

A possible alternative explanation for the behavior:

If a file is included, it is possibly parsed every include-time.(?)
While parsing, every function in global scope is tried to register. THIS gets wrong, when multiple times included, and it produces an error.

If functions are defined within block scopes, their registration seems to be delayed until execution of such a block. Thus, not the function "function_exists" functions wrong, but simply the philosophy of the interpreter produces such results.

Thus, the same effect can be achieved by simply putting block braces around the contents of an include_once file:

if (function_exists('function_in_question')) return;
{
    function function_in_question(...)
    {
        ...
    }
    ...other stuff
}

...which is equivalent to...

if (!function_exists('function_in_question'))
{
    function function_in_question(...)
    {
        ...
    }
    ...other stuff
}
up
0
brooklynphil at hotmail dot com
7 years ago
to bob at thethirdshift dot net
regarding is_callable vs function_exists.

using your code
is_callable = TRUE, function_exists = FALSE

Did 10000 is_callables in 0.0443360805511 seconds
Did 10000 function_exists in 0.0111110210419 seconds

then we replace
is_callable(array('test','test'));
with
$callarray = array('test','test'); // place this outside for-loop
is_callable($callarray);

is_callable = TRUE, function_exists = FALSE

Did 10000 is_callables in 0.0314660072327 seconds
Did 10000 function_exists in 0.0120670795441 seconds

then we replace
is_callable(array('test','test'));
with
is_callable('test','test');

is_callable = TRUE, function_exists = FALSE

Did 10000 is_callables in 0.00991606712341 seconds
Did 10000 function_exists in 0.0113790035248 seconds

I hope you can see that loop-testing functions is not so simple. :)
up
0
Dan
8 years ago
I would like to comment on the following post:

A note of caution: function_exists() appears to be case-insensitive (at least as of PHP 4.3.8).  e.g.:

<?php
  
function MyCasedFunction() {
       return
true;
   }

  
// Will return true, even though casing is "wrong"
  
if (function_exists("mYcAsEdFuNcTiOn"))
       echo
"I see it!";
?>

I believe that function calls itself are case insensitve, so this function is returning a valid truth. PHP doesn't care about cases.
up
0
fili at fili dot nl
9 years ago
To prevent direct calls to included files i use the following technique.

In the main file create an empty function with a random name. Like so:

<?php
function hjudejdjiwe() { return true; }
?>

Then check for the existence of this function within your include:

<?php
if (!function_exists('hjudejdjiwe')) { die('!'); }
?>

Simple but effective.
up
-1
b dot g dot dariush at gmail dot com
8 months ago
function_exists() does not cache its query internally.

by executing the following code

        $funcs = \array_shift(\get_defined_functions());
        $l = new \core\utiles\loadTime;
        $times = 0;
        $l->start();
        for($index = 0; $index<count($funcs); $index++)
        {
            foreach($funcs as $func)
            {
                $times++;
                if(\function_exists($func)) ;
            }
        }
        $s = $l->stop();
        echo "<span style='color:green'>$times</span> took : $s";
        # the output would be
         $> 2365444 took : 0.70324

By executing the

        $funcs = \array_shift(\get_defined_functions());
        $l = new \core\utiles\loadTime;
        $times = 0;
        $l->start();
        static $func_check = array();
        for($index = 0; $index<count($funcs); $index++)
        {
            foreach($funcs as $func)
            {
                $times++;
                if(!isset($func_check[$func]))
                {
                    if(\function_exists($func)) ;
                    $func_check[$func] = 1;
                }
                else $func_check[$func];
            }
        }
        $s = $l->stop();
        echo "<span style='color:green'>$times</span> took : $s";
        # the output would be
        $> 2365444 took : 0.53446

There is a 0.16878 seconds improvement, when you use static array to cache methods existence.
up
0
ckrack at i-z dot de
10 years ago
i was wondering whether is_callable or function exists is faster when checking class methods.

is_callable(array('foo', 'bar'));
function_exists('foo::bar');

my results when doing each operation 10000 times with a simple test class were the following:

is_callable: 0.28671383857727 seconds
function_exists: 0.14569997787476 seconds

(following tests have proved this to be true).

thus you can see, function_exists is twice as fast as is_callable.
up
0
dshearin at excite dot com
11 years ago
This can be used to conditionally define a user function. In this sense, it can act as a sort of inline include_once().

For example, suppose you have a function A that calls function B. B is only used inside function A and is never called from anywhere else in the script. It's logical (and perfectly legal in PHP) to define B inside of A's definition, like so:

<?php
function A($inputArray)
{
   if (!
function_exists('B'))
   {
      function
B($item)
      {
          
// Do something with $item
         // and return result
         
return $result;
      }
   }
   foreach (
$inputArray as $nextItem) $outputArray[] = B($nextItem);
   return
$outputArray;   
}
?>

Without the function_exists test, you would get a fatal error the second time you called A, as PHP would think you were trying to redefine B (not legal in PHP). The placement of the test is also important. Since the if block is executed sequentially, like any other block of code, it must come before any call to the function defined within.
up
-1
andi at splitbrain dot org
8 years ago
function_exists will return false for functions disabled with the disable_functions ini directive. However those functions are still declared so trying to define them yourself will fail.

<?php
if(!function_exists('readfile')){
  function
readfile($file){
   
$handle=@fopen($cache,"r");
    echo @
fread($handle,filesize($file));
    @
fclose($handle);
  }
}
?>

The above will issue a "Cannot redeclare readfile()" fatal error if readfile was disabled with disable_functions.
up
-1
admin at gk-root dot com
2 years ago
// If you want to chack if the function is enabled or disable in php.ini you can use this function:

<?php
function func_enabled($func) {
   
$disabled = explode(',', ini_get('disable_functions'));
    foreach (
$disabled as $disableFunction) {
       
$is_disabled[] = trim($disableFunction);
    }
    if (
in_array($func,$is_disabled)) {
       
$it_is_disabled["m"] = $func.'() has been disabled for security reasons in php.ini';
       
$it_is_disabled["s"] = 0;
    } else {
       
$it_is_disabled["m"] = $func.'() is allow to use';
       
$it_is_disabled["s"] = 1;
    }
    return
$it_is_disabled;
}
?>

// An example of how to use:

<?php
$if_is_disabled
= func_enabled('exec'); // return Arrey
echo $if_is_disabled["m"]; // return text value
echo '<br/>';
echo
$if_is_disabled["s"]; // return 1 or 0
?>
up
-2
zach at bygeekz dot com
6 years ago
to php at fluidthoughts dot com

you aren't comparing against false, that if compares against true, so it's going to return that, as false != true
true being 1, True, (bool)True, etc.
false being 0, False, Null, etc
<?php

$foo
=null;
if (
$foo) { echo 'yay'; } //does not echo yay, because null is not True

$foo=false;
if (
$foo) { echo 'yay'; } //does not echo yay, because false is not True

$foo=null;
if (!
$foo) { echo 'yay'; } //echoes yay!

$foo=false;
if (!
$foo) { echo 'yay'; } //echoes yay!

?>

This..
<?php
   
if (!function_exists('')) {
                echo
"empty string function doesnt exist as compared as negative\n";
        }

        if (!
function_exists(NULL)) {
                echo
"NULL function doesnt exist as compared as negative\n";
        }
?>
Works.

Alternatively, to enter upon existance..

Use your code. Since they dont exist, it wont enter..
up
-1
bob at thethirdshift dot net
10 years ago
I, too, was wondering whether is_callable or function exists is faster when checking class methods.  So, I setup the following test:

<?php
function doTimes($start, $end)
  {
   
$start_time = explode (" ", $start);
   
$start_time = $start_time[1] + $start_time[0];
   
$end_time = explode (" ", $end);
   
$end_time = $end_time[1] + $end_time[0];
   
$time = $end_time - $start_time;
    return
$time;
  }

class
test
 
{
      function
test()
      {
          return
true;
      }
  }
 
$callableIsTrue = false;
$startIsCallable = microtime();
for(
$i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++)
  {
      if(
is_callable(array('test', 'test'))) { $callableIsTrue = true; }
  }
$endIsCallable = microtime();

$existsIsTrue = false;
$startExists = microtime();
for(
$i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++)
  {
      if(
function_exists('test::test')) { $existsIsTrue = true; }
  }
$endExists = microtime();

$timeIsCallable = doTimes($startIsCallable, $endIsCallable);
$timeExists     = doTimes($startExists, $endExists);

echo
"<b>is_callable = ".($callableIsTrue ? "TRUE" : "FALSE")."</b>, \n";
echo
"<b>function_exists = ".($existsIsTrue ? "TRUE" : "FALSE")."</b><br>\n";

echo
"<br>Did 10000 is_callables in ".$timeIsCallable." seconds";
echo
"<br>Did 10000 function_exists in ".$timeExists." seconds";
?>

This gives the output :

is_callable = TRUE, function_exists = FALSE

Did 10000 is_callables in 0.0640790462494 seconds
Did 10000 function_exists in 0.0304429531097 seconds

So the fact that function_exists is twice as fast is slightly over shadowed by the fact that it doesn't work on class methods, at least not as far as I can tell.
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-1
breadman
11 years ago
Functions within a function are better off as anonymous returns from create_function(), unless you want to be able to call it elsewhere.

However, I have used this in skinning:  I use alert_box() to display certain errors, like a faulty SQL query.  This simply calls display_alert(), which is defined in my skin scripts.  However, alert_box() is sometimes called before I know which skin to load, so it has its own functionality which it uses if function_exists('display_alert') returns false.
up
-2
dieter at edarta dot be
7 years ago
to brooklynphil at hotmail dot com:

Your post is misleading, namely the 3rd and last speedtest you describe is an unfair comparison:

<?php
is_callable
('test','test');
?>

The value of the 2nd parameter $syntax_only is 'test' and this evaluates to boolean true. In other words, this is exactly the same as calling the function like this:

<?php
is_callable
('test',true);
?>

Of course this will be faster because is_callable only does a very basic syntaxcheck. From the documentation: 'It will only reject simple variables that are not strings, or an array that does not have a valid structure to be used as a callback.'

If you omit this erroneous 3rd test, then according to your examples function_exists is 2 to 4 times faster.

I hope you can see that loop-testing functions is not so simple. :)

rtfm
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-2
eddiec at stararcher dot com
7 years ago
Note that function_exists will return TRUE in the following situation, presumably because the function "testfunc" was defined when the script was PARSED/ITERPRETED, before the function_exists call was made at RUNTIME:

<?php
if (function_exists('testfunc')) return;
function
testfunc() { }
?>

So, this construction is not useful for preventing testfunc from being multiply defined if the script is muliply included or required.

However, the following construction DOES work to prevent multiple defines of testfunc:

<?php
if (!function_exists('testfunc')) {
  function
testfunc() { }
}
?>

CONTRAST this with similar uses of defined() which is completely runtime evaluated.  These both work:

<?php
if (defined('testfunc_defined')) return;
define('testfunc_defined', 1);
function
testfunc() { }
?>

AND...

<?php
if (!defined('testfunc_defined')) {
define('testfunc_defined', 1);
function
testfunc() { }
}
up
-1
chaumo
9 years ago
to avoid direct calls this can be better than function_exists
in the parent file:
<?php
define
("IN_MODULE",true);
?>
and in the target file:
<?php
if(!defined("IN_MODULE")) die("Can't access the file directly");
?>
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