PHP 5.6.0RC3 is available

pg_last_error

(PHP 4 >= 4.2.0, PHP 5)

pg_last_error Lit le dernier message d'erreur sur la connexion

Description

string pg_last_error ([ resource $connection ] )

pg_last_error() retourne le dernier message d'erreur pour une connexion connection.

Les messages d'erreur peuvent être écrasés par des appels internes à l'extension PostgreSQL (libpq) : il se peut que le message retourné ne soit pas approprié, notamment si plusieurs erreurs ont eu lieu dans le module.

Utilisez pg_result_error(), pg_result_error_field(), pg_result_status() et pg_connection_status() pour améliorer la gestion des erreurs.

Note:

Auparavant, cette fonction s'appelait pg_errormessage().

Liste de paramètres

connection

La ressource de connexion de la base de données PostgreSQL. Lorsque connection n'est pas présent, la connexion par défaut est utilisée. La connexion par défaut est la dernière connexion faite par pg_connect() ou pg_pconnect().

Valeurs de retour

Une chaîne de caractères contenant le dernier message d'erreur sur la connexion connection ou FALSE en cas d'erreur.

Exemples

Exemple #1 Exemple avec pg_last_error()

<?php
  $dbconn 
pg_connect("dbname=publisher") or die("Connexion impossible");

  
// Requête qui échoue
  
$res pg_query($dbconn"select * from doesnotexist");
  
  echo 
pg_last_error($dbconn);
?>

Voir aussi

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 1 note

up
0
Tamas Bolner
3 years ago
From a practical view there are two types of error messages when using transactions:

-"Normal" errors: in this case, the application should stop the current process and show an error message to the user.

-Deadlock errors. This shows that the deadlock detection process of PostgreSQL found a circle of dependency, and broke it by rolling back the transaction in one of the processes, which gets this error msg. In this case, the application should not stop, but repeat the transaction.

I found no discrete way to find out which case are we dealing with. This interface doesn't support error codes, so we have to search for patterns in the message text.

Here is an example for PostgreSQL database connection class. It throws a PostgresException on "normal" errors, and DependencyException in the case of a broken deadlock, when we have to repeat the transaction.

postgres.php:
<?php
class PostgresException extends Exception {
    function
__construct($msg) { parent::__construct($msg); }
}

class
DependencyException extends PostgresException {
    function
__construct() { parent::__construct("deadlock"); }
}

class
pg {
    public static
$connection;
   
    private static function
connect() {
       
self::$connection = @pg_connect("dbname=foodb user=foouser password=foopasswd");
        if (
self::$connection === FALSE) {
            throw(new
PostgresException("Can't connect to database server."));
        }
    }
   
    public static function
query($sql) {
        if (!isset(
self::$connection)) {
           
self::connect();
        }
       
       
$result = @pg_query(self::$connection, $sql);
        if (
$result === FALSE) {
           
$error = pg_last_error(self::$connection);
            if (
stripos($error, "deadlock detected") !== false) throw(new DependencyException());
           
            throw(new
PostgresException($error.": ".$sql));
        }
       
       
$out = array();
        while ( (
$d = pg_fetch_assoc($result)) !== FALSE) {
           
$out[] = $d;
        }
       
        return
$out;
    }
}
?>

It should be used in this way:

test.php:
<?php
include("postgres.php");

do {
   
$repeat = false;
    try {
       
pg::query("begin");
       
        ...

       
$result = pg::query("SELECT * FROM public.kitten");

        ...

       
pg::query("commit");
    }
    catch (
DependencyException $e) {
       
pg::query("rollback");
       
$repeat = true;
    }
} while (
$repeat);
?>

The normal errors should be caught at the frontend.

Tamas
To Top